The Dodgers and MLB have a long, boring hearing; outcome to be decided today

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Yesterday was the much-anticipated hearing in the Dodgers bankruptcy case, the purpose of which was to determine who gets to fund the Dodgers until they emerge from Chapter 11.

I followed the blow-by-blow via the Twitter feeds of reporters in the courtroom. Even then — with the ability to watch baseball games, write about other subjects, play with my kids and do any number of other things — I was bored to tears.  I can’t imagine what the Bill Shaikins of the world must have felt trapped in that place for the entire ten hour hearing.

For as long as the thing lasted, there was only one witness: Dodgers assistant treasurer Jeffery Ingram.  Following vicariously, it seemed like he didn’t do the best job in the world for Frank McCourt.  He voiced the McCourt position well enough: the Dodgers don’t want MLB financing because Bud Selig is out to get Frank McCourt and you don’t want to take loans from your enemies.  But on cross examination he basically admitted that, yeah, MLB’s financing was better on their basic terms.

And that may be good enough for the judge who, at the close of the day, said that he was going to decide the matter based on the financial terms: “”This is about dollars and cents. This is not a control issue,” he said.  Based on that alone, observers got the feeling that, when he rules today, as is expected, he’ll side with MLB’s financing, not McCourt’s.

The implications: well, the judge’s words about this not being about control notwithstanding — and notwithstanding the arguments of MLB’s lawyers, who said that Selig does not intend to use financing as a means of squeezing out McCourt — it’s hard to see how such an outcome wouldn’t put MLB in a very strong position vis-a-vis our favorite spendthrift owner, marginalizing him practically, even if he’s not technically moved aside.

Noah Syndergaard scratched with a “tired arm”

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Mets manager Terry Collins says that he has scratched Noah Syndergaard, who was supposed to start this afternoon’s game against the Braves. In his place will go Matt Harvey.

Syndergaard, Collins says, has “tired arm.” But also says he has some discomfort in his right biceps. He will have an MRI, but Syndergaard says it’s not serious and that he could pitch as soon as Sunday. Collins says this is an abundance-of-caution type thing, saying “we can’t take a chance on this guy.” Which is true.

The Mets ace is 1-1 with a 1.73 ERA and 30 strikeouts in 26 innings. He has walked no one this year. Not a soul.

James Paxton has a fantastic new nickname

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James Paxton of the Mariners is 3-0 with a 1.39 ERA, 39 strikeouts and only six walks in 32.1 innings of work over five starts. Last night he shut the Tigers down, tossing seven shutout innings, striking out nine and allowing only four hits. With Felix Hernandez looking less than king-like lately, Paxton is asserting himself as the new ace of the Seattle staff.

And now the tall Canadian native has a nickname to match his ace-like status:

“Pax was really outstanding and we certainly needed it,” manager Scott Servais said of the Canadian southpaw. “Big Maple is what he was nicknamed tonight and I kind of like that. He was awesome.”

“Big Maple” is a fantastic nickname. That’s the sort of nickname guys used to get back when nicknames were great. Before managers just put “y” at the end of dudes’ names and before the “First Initial-First Three Letters of The Last Name” convention took hold in the wake of A-Rod.

“Big Maple.” That makes me smile. I’m gonna be smiling all dang day because of that.