Happy Pumpsie Green Day!

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We all know to celebrate the anniversary of Jackie Robinson’s major league debut, but there were 15 other teams that existed during baseball’s segregated days which later came to see the light.

Eventually anyway.  The Red Sox were the last, fielding their first black player on this day in 1959. His name was Pumpsie Green. Still is, actually, as he’s still alive and — if Wikipedia is to be believed — living in El Cerrito, California.

Green was a pinch runner on July 21, 1959 but eventually played five seasons in the majors, hitting .246 with 13 homers and 74 RBI. He and a teammate once abandoned the Red Sox during a trip to New York and weren’t seen for three days, when they were spotted trying to board a plane for Israel without passports.  That’s also from the Wikipedia page, so you know, I’m going to assume it’s true. And kinda neat in a Lost Weekend sort of way.

Why did it take so long for the Red Sox to get Green — or any other black player — on the field?  To use the words of Red Sox President Larry Lucchino, who spoke to NPR on the matter back in 2002, it had everything to do with the Red Sox’ “undeniable legacy of racial intolerance.” That intolerance led them to cut short a tryout of Jackie Robinson in 1945 and to pass on Willie Mays a few years later. So many missed opportunities for Boston.

But just because they were slow to join the modern world doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t recognize Pumpsie Green. I’m not saying every Red Sox player should wear number 12 for the day or anything, but three cheers for Pumpsie are in order, right?

Shelby Miller left Sunday’s start with forearm tightness

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Diamondbacks pitcher Shelby Miller left Sunday’s start against the Dodgers after four-plus innings due to tightness in his right forearm, the team announced. He’ll be reevaluated tomorrow. Needless to say, though, a forearm injury is very concerning. In his four innings, Miller gave up three runs on four hits and five walks with three strikeouts, raising his ERA to 4.09.

Miller, 26, has had a nightmare of a time since joining the Diamondbacks in December 2015. Last year, he made 20 starts and posted a 6.15 ERA. He suffered a finger injury suffered from scraping his hand on the pitcher’s mound with his follow-through, and he was also demoted to Triple-A during the summer as well.

Ivan Nova finally issued his first walk. It was to an AL pitcher taking his first major league at-bat.

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Pirates starter Ivan Nova has been outstanding in his first three starts of the 2017 season. He yielded only five earned runs in 20 innings for a tidy 2.25 ERA. But even more impressively, Nova didn’t issue a walk in any of those starts.

That changed on Sunday afternoon against the Yankees, but in a most peculiar way. Nova had struck out the side in the first inning, notched a 1-2-3 frame in the second, and got two quick ground outs to begin the third inning, bringing up Yankees pitcher Jordan Montgomery for his first major league at-bat. Montgomery never batted in the minor leagues, either, so Sunday’s AB against Nova was his first since his senior year of high school in 2011. Montgomery took the first two pitches for balls, then a called strike, a ball, and another called strike to even the count. Nova came in with his sixth consecutive fastball but it missed low, walking the Yankees’ pitcher for his first free pass of the 2017 season.

Nova got out of the inning without any further issue. He wound up going seven innings, giving up a lone run on four hits and a walk with seven strikeouts, lowering his ERA to an even 2.00.