Happy Pumpsie Green Day!

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We all know to celebrate the anniversary of Jackie Robinson’s major league debut, but there were 15 other teams that existed during baseball’s segregated days which later came to see the light.

Eventually anyway.  The Red Sox were the last, fielding their first black player on this day in 1959. His name was Pumpsie Green. Still is, actually, as he’s still alive and — if Wikipedia is to be believed — living in El Cerrito, California.

Green was a pinch runner on July 21, 1959 but eventually played five seasons in the majors, hitting .246 with 13 homers and 74 RBI. He and a teammate once abandoned the Red Sox during a trip to New York and weren’t seen for three days, when they were spotted trying to board a plane for Israel without passports.  That’s also from the Wikipedia page, so you know, I’m going to assume it’s true. And kinda neat in a Lost Weekend sort of way.

Why did it take so long for the Red Sox to get Green — or any other black player — on the field?  To use the words of Red Sox President Larry Lucchino, who spoke to NPR on the matter back in 2002, it had everything to do with the Red Sox’ “undeniable legacy of racial intolerance.” That intolerance led them to cut short a tryout of Jackie Robinson in 1945 and to pass on Willie Mays a few years later. So many missed opportunities for Boston.

But just because they were slow to join the modern world doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t recognize Pumpsie Green. I’m not saying every Red Sox player should wear number 12 for the day or anything, but three cheers for Pumpsie are in order, right?

Report: Mets ownership backs Terry Collins

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The Mets entered Sunday night’s game against the Pirates with a disappointing 20-27 record. While the club has dealt with a litany of injuries, manager Terry Collins has also drawn criticism for in-game decision-making, particularly regarding his decision-making.

Owner Fred Wilpon is still Collins’ strongest supporter, however, Newsday’s Marc Carig reports. As a result, the team is unlikely to make a managerial change anytime soon. If the Mets continue to struggle, though, ownership may feel pressured to make a change.

Collins became the longest-tenured manager in Mets history last week. Collins managed the Mets to a 77-85 record in 2011 and has overall helped the club go 501-518, winning the NL Pennant in 2015. He is not signed to a contract beyond this season.

Joe Mauer becomes first Twin to reach base seven times in a game since Rod Carew

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Twins first baseman Joe Mauer had a game for the record books on Sunday against the Rays. He finished 4-for-5 with an RBI double, a solo home run, two singles, and three walks in eight plate appearances. Unfortunately for him, the Twins still lost 8-6 in 15 innings.

ESPN’s Stats & Info notes that Mauer is the first Twin to reach base seven times in one game since Rod Carew in 1972 against the Brewers. The last player to reach base seven times in one game (without the aid of an error) was Giants shortstop Brandon Crawford on August 8 last season against the Marlins. The feat has only been accomplished seven times this decade, so about once a year.

After Sunday’s game, Mauer is batting .283/.363/.408 with three home runs, 18 RBI, and 23 runs scored in 171 plate appearances. Not too shabby.