Diamondbacks closer J.J. Putz hoping to return next week

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Out since late June with elbow tendinitis, J.J. Putz threw one inning in an extended spring training game yesterday and is hoping to rejoin the Diamondbacks’ bullpen early next week.

Kirk Gibson indicated that Putz will resume closing right away, but the manager told Anthony Fenech of MLB.com that he wants to see the injured right-hander work back-to-back days before coming off the disabled list.

Putz is expected to pitch Friday and Saturday at Triple-A, so barring a setback he could be cleared to return as soon as Monday.

In his absence David Hernandez has converted 7-of-7 save chances while allowing zero runs and Putz blew four saves in June before finally being shut down, so it would make sense for the Diamondbacks to ease him back into the closer role regardless of his ability to pitch on consecutive days.

Putz, who signed a two-year, $10 million deal as a free agent this offseason, converted 16-of-16 save chances with a 1.57 ERA through the end of May before his elbow starting barking again.

Autopsy report reveals morphine, Ambien in Roy Halladay’s system

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Traces of morphine, amphetamine, Prozac and Ambien were found in Roy Halladay’s system at the time of his death, according to the autopsy findings Zachary T. Sampson of the Tampa Bay Times reported Friday. The former Phillies and Blue Jays ace and two-time Cy Young Award winner was killed in a plane crash off the Gulf of Mexico last November. While the exact cause of the incident has not yet been determined, it was a combination of blunt force trauma and drowning that resulted in the 40-year-old’s death.

Further details from the NY Daily News revealed that Halladay sustained a fractured leg and a “subdural hemorrhage, multiple rib fractures, and lung, liver and spleen injuries” during the crash. As for the drugs present in his system, the autopsy report suggests that the presence of morphine could be linked to heroin use, though there’s no clear evidence that he did so.

The toxicology results also determined that Halladay had a blood-alcohol content level of 0.01. A BAC of 0.08 is the legal limit for operating a car, but current FAA regulations prohibit any alcohol consumption for eight hours before operating aircraft. Halladay was both the pilot and sole passenger aboard the plane when it crashed.

Previous statements from the National Transportation Safety Board indicate that the investigation is still ongoing and could take up to two years to resolve.