U2 continues to wreck ballparks across the country

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We’ve talked about how the current U2 tour — which was supposed to happen last summer, but got bumped to this summer because Bono had to go heal the sick someplace or something — has been disrupting the baseball schedule. See, their stage setup is gigantic and it takes several days on either side of the concert for construction and break-down, so when they’ve gone to Anaheim or Miami or wherever, it has caused the team to have to go on the road for a long time.

The current U2 exiles are the St. Louis Cardinals, who turned their ballpark over to the band as the All-Star break began and won’t be back until Monday.  But as Dan O’Neill reported yesterday, it’s not just the schedule that gets messed up: it’s the turf too:

“This is pretty much a complete destruction of your field,” Findley said of the concert. “When they bring this thing in here, and set it on your field for a week, no grass is going to survive that.”

The “thing” to which Findley referred to is better known as “the Claw,” a massive superstructure that houses each U2 performance. It is the largest concert stage ever assembled, a four-legged, spiderlike structure that hovers over the concert floor, holding speaker systems, lights and video elements.

The steel assembly is 167 feet tall and transported to and from concert sites by 120 trucks. The U2 tour includes a production crew of 137 workers, which is supplemented at each concert location by some 120 hired hands. Daily costs of the production are estimated to be around $750,000, which does not include the actual construction of the stage.

Nothing says rock and roll like a team of hundreds setting up an elaborate performance space at the cost of millions. Indeed, I’m pretty sure we’re reaching Hotblack Desiato and Disaster Area territory here. All that’s missing now is a space ship crashing into the sun to create a solar flare and The Edge spending a year dead for tax purposes.

Oh, wait.

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. saved by the ivy

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The ALCS had a weird play in Game 4 on Tuesday night, but Game 4 of the NLCS did as well. This one involved Cubs outfielder Albert Almora, Jr. and his attempt to spark a rally in the bottom of the ninth inning against Dodgers reliever Ross Stripling.

After Alex Avila singled, Almora ripped a double to left field, past a diving Enrique Hernandez. The ball rolled to the ivy in front of the wall. Most outfielders there would’ve put their hands up, which would have alerted the umpires to call an immediate ground-rule double. Hernandez didn’t, instead fishing the ball out and firing it back into the infield. Avila had stopped at third base, but Almora kept running. Much to his surprise, he pulled up into third base to see his teammate standing there, resigned to his fate as a dead duck. Third baseman Justin Turner applied the tag on Almora for what he thought was the first out of the inning.

Almora, however, was then sent back to second base after the umpires correctly called a ground-rule double.

Unfortunately for the Cubs, the lucky break didn’t help as closer Kenley Jansen came in and took care of business, retiring all three batters he faced without letting an inherited runner score. The Dodgers won 6-1 and now lead the NLCS three games to none. They’ll try to punch their ticket to the World Series on Wednesday.