U2 stage

U2 continues to wreck ballparks across the country


We’ve talked about how the current U2 tour — which was supposed to happen last summer, but got bumped to this summer because Bono had to go heal the sick someplace or something — has been disrupting the baseball schedule. See, their stage setup is gigantic and it takes several days on either side of the concert for construction and break-down, so when they’ve gone to Anaheim or Miami or wherever, it has caused the team to have to go on the road for a long time.

The current U2 exiles are the St. Louis Cardinals, who turned their ballpark over to the band as the All-Star break began and won’t be back until Monday.  But as Dan O’Neill reported yesterday, it’s not just the schedule that gets messed up: it’s the turf too:

“This is pretty much a complete destruction of your field,” Findley said of the concert. “When they bring this thing in here, and set it on your field for a week, no grass is going to survive that.”

The “thing” to which Findley referred to is better known as “the Claw,” a massive superstructure that houses each U2 performance. It is the largest concert stage ever assembled, a four-legged, spiderlike structure that hovers over the concert floor, holding speaker systems, lights and video elements.

The steel assembly is 167 feet tall and transported to and from concert sites by 120 trucks. The U2 tour includes a production crew of 137 workers, which is supplemented at each concert location by some 120 hired hands. Daily costs of the production are estimated to be around $750,000, which does not include the actual construction of the stage.

Nothing says rock and roll like a team of hundreds setting up an elaborate performance space at the cost of millions. Indeed, I’m pretty sure we’re reaching Hotblack Desiato and Disaster Area territory here. All that’s missing now is a space ship crashing into the sun to create a solar flare and The Edge spending a year dead for tax purposes.

Oh, wait.

ALDS, Game 1: Rangers vs. Blue Jays lineups

Toronto Blue Jays' starting pitcher David Price works against the Baltimore Orioles during first inning of a baseball game in Toronto, Saturday, Sept. 5, 2015. (Darren Calabrese/The Canadian Press via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

Here are the Rangers and Blue Jays lineups for Game 1 of the ALDS in Toronto:

CF Delino DeShields
RF Shin-Soo Choo
3B Adrian Beltre
DH Prince Fielder
1B Mike Napoli
LF Josh Hamilton
SS Elvis Andrus
2B Rougned Odor
C Robinson Chirinos

SP Yovani Gallardo

With left-hander David Price on the mound for Toronto the Rangers are going with Mike Napoli at first base over Mitch Moreland. Beyond that it’s a pretty standard lineup for Texas, or at least standard for what manager Jeff Banister used down the stretch once Josh Hamilton was healthy enough to play left field.

LF Ben Revere
3B Josh Donaldson
RF Jose Bautista
DH Edwin Encarnacion
SS Troy Tulowitzki
1B Justin Smoak
C Russell Martin
2B Ryan Goins
CF Kevin Pillar

SP David Price

After returning from the disabled list for the final weekend of the regular season Troy Tulowitzki is in the lineup and batting fifth. That allows Ryan Goins to play second base in place of the injured Devon Travis. Justin Smoak gets the nod over Chris Colabello at first base against a right-hander.

Astros leave Chad Qualls off playoff roster, add Preston Tucker

Chad Qualls Getty
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Houston made one unexpected change to the roster for the ALDS, leaving off veteran reliever Chad Qualls.

Qualls warmed up but never appeared in the Wild Card game win over the Yankees and during the regular season the 36-year-old right-hander logged 49 innings with a 4.38 ERA and 46/9 K/BB ratio. Qualls was on the Astros’ last playoff team in 2005.

Utility man Jonathan Villar has been bumped off the roster in favor of outfielder Preston Tucker, as the Astros opted for a good left-handed bat off the bench versus the Royals rather than Villar’s speed.