“I do think Lenny was deceptively smart in a lot of ways”

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We’ve covered the tabloidy aspects of Lenny Dykstra’s plummet from grace pretty thoroughly. Now, then, it seems like a good time to link to a story that covers that fall in a more thorough fashion.  It’s by Harvey Araton in The New York Times and it’s pretty good.

The quote from the headline comes from a guy who tries to explain that Dykstra’s post-retirement career as a stock-picker was no sham.  Sadly, however, it’s belied by everything we’ve learned about Dykstra in the past few years, this article included.  He basically ripped off another stock analyst’s picks and charged people a thousand bucks a year for a subscription to such “insights.”

Oh, and his current Twitter account is a quasi-fraud too.  In jail, Dykstra can’t really run it, so there’s a 26-year-old kid from Philly who runs the thing, tweeting mildly-inspirational hokum and asking for money for Dykstra’s legal defense. The 26-year-old idolized Nails when he was a boy, naturally.

Joe Maddon ejected in eighth inning of NLCS Game 4 after umpires overturn a Wade Davis strikeout

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Cubs manager Joe Maddon was once again ejected from an NLCS game, this time in Game 4.

In the top of the eighth inning, closer Wade Davis found himself in a bit of a pickle. He gave up a leadoff home run to Justin Turner, cutting the Cubs’ lead to 3-2. Davis then walked Yasiel Puig. He was able to get Andre Ethier to pop up, bringing up Curtis Granderson. Granderson worked the count 2-2, then fouled off a pitch. And then he appeared to swing through a curve that bounced in the dirt. Catcher Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out, but Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, so it was a foul ball.

Wolf conferred with the other umpires. After a brief delay, the strikeout was overturned and Granderson was given new life in the batter’s box. Only… replays showed that Wolf got it right the first time.

Understandably, Maddon was livid. On the broadcast, one could see Maddon gesturing to the umpires to look at the replay on the video board behind the stands in left field. The argument fell on deaf ears and he was ejected. Thankfully for the Cubs, justice prevailed and Davis struck out Granderson on the next pitch.

It’ll be interesting to see if Maddon makes any political comparisons after the game. He likened the slide rule, the impetus behind his Game 1 ejection, to the soda tax.