Cincinnati Reds v Pittsburgh Pirates

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

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Pirates 1, Reds 0: Pittsburgh keeps rolling, as four pitchers combine to shut out the Redlegs for the second night in a row. This is all pretty trippy, but I’m curious to see what happens to the Buccos when they start a ten-game stretch against St. Louis, Atlanta and Philly beginning this Friday.

Rangers 7, Angels 0: Texas apparently does not lose baseball games anymore. Twelve straight for the Rangers, this one behind eight shutout innings from Alexi Ogando.

Mets 4, Cardinals 2: Jose Reyes comes back and gets two hits and scores a run, Carlos Beltran comes back and goes 3 for 3. In fact, every Mets starting position player got a hit and Dillon Gee pitched seven strong innings.

Orioles 6, Red Sox 2: Baltimore finally figures out how to beat Boston, besting them for the first time in seven meetings. Two runs in seven innings allowed for Jeremy Guthrie, who broke a personal seven-game losing streak against the Sox.

Tigers 8, Athletics 3: Things were going just fine until the bottom of the fifth, when Detroit decided that it was time to beat the living hell out of Guillermo Moscoso. Sometimes Tigers can just turn on you like that, which is why they make poor pets.

Padres 4, Marlins 0: It was bullpen trade chip audition night for the Padres, as Qualls, Adams, Gregerson and Bell all got into the game, each holding the Fish scoreless. Of course Tim Stauffer did most of the work, shutting out Florida for six. By the way, I think I have used some variation of the phrase “shutting out” more so far this year than I did the previous three years of this feature combined.

Rays 3, Yankees 2: Bartolo Colon returned to useful form, but the pen couldn’t hold it. Of course, it’s not like they had a big margin for error given how tied up Jeremy Hellickson had the Bombers’ lineup.

Twins 2, Indians 1: Minnesota entered the bottom of the ninth down 1-0, but loaded the bases and then Danny Valencia won it with a walk-off single. I wasn’t really paying attention to this game, but Gleeman was, and he said that Tribe starter Justin Masterson threw 104 pitches in the game and that 103 of them were fastballs. Heavens to Betsy. It obviously worked, given that he shut out the Twins for seven and two-thirds. Too bad for the Indians that he couldn’t keep pumping those speedballs in there for all nine.

Royals 4, White Sox 2: Duffy beats Peavy. That almost sounds kind of cute. Pretend they’re the names of cats or teddy bears or something.  Or that instead of nouns, their names are adjectives.

Phillies 4, Cubs 2: Another bullpen failure for the Cubs, with Sean Marshall playing the role of Carlos Marmol. Wait, that’s not fair. Marshall didn’t walk the whole ballpark or anything. He was just hit. Michael Martinez had the two-run double in the ninth that proved to be the game-winner.

Astros 7, Nationals 6: Clint Barmes drove in three to help J.A. Happ get his first win in two months.

Blue Jays 6, Mariners 5: It took fourteen innings, but we got to the same place we’ve gotten a lot lately: a Mariners loss. That’s ten straight for Seattle.  Rajai Davis reached on a single in the 14th, stole second and third, and then came in to end it on a John McDonald sacrifice fly.

Rockies 12, Braves 3: Brandon Beachy got shelled for six runs in the first three innings and then the less-impressive end of the Braves bullpen performed pretty substandard mopup duty. This gave Ubaldo Jimenez way more run support than he needed on a night when he struck out nine while pitching into the seventh inning. Three RBI a piece for Troy Tulowitzki, Seth Smith and Dexter Fowler.

Brewers 11, Diamondbacks 3: Five homers for the Brewers — two of them by Yuniesky Betancourt of all people– as Barry Enright decided that last night was a good one to work on his batting practice pitches.

Giants 5, Dodgers 3: Brandon Belt returned and in his first game back homered in the second to kick off the scoring and doubled in two in the seventh to put the Giants up to stay. That sound you hear is Aubrey Huff getting comfortable on the bench.

Jorge Posada highlights 16 one-and-done players on Hall of Fame ballot

NEW YORK, NY - JANUARY 24:  Jorge Posada addresses the media during a press conference to announces his retirement from the New York Yankees at Yankee Stadium on January 24, 2012 in the Bronx borough of  New York City.  (Photo by Mike Stobe/Getty Images)
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Former Yankees catcher Jorge Posada received only 17 total votes (3.8 percent) on the 2017 Hall of Fame ballot. Unfortunately, he is one of 16 players who fell short of the five percent vote threshold and is no longer eligible on the ballot. The other players are Magglio Ordonez (three votes, 0.7 percent), Edgar Renteria (two, 0.5 percent), Jason Varitek (two, 0.5 percent), Tim Wakefield (one, 0.2 percent), Casey Blake (zero), Pat Burrell (zero), Orlando Cabrera (zero), Mike Cameron (zero), J.D. Drew (zero), Carlos Guillen (zero), Derrek Lee (zero), Melvin Mora (zero), Arthur Rhodes (zero), Freddy Sanchez (zero), and Matt Stairs (zero).

Posada, 45, helped the Yankees win four World Series championships from 1998-2000 as well as 2009. He made the American League All-Star team five times, won five Silver Sluggers, and had a top-three AL MVP Award finish. Posada also hit 20 or more homers in eight seasons, finished with a career adjusted OPS (a.k.a. OPS+) of 121, and accrued 42.7 Wins Above Replacement in his 17-year career according to Baseball Reference.

While Posada’s OPS+ and WAR are lacking compared to other Hall of Famers — he was 18th of 34 eligible players in JAWS, Jay Jaffe’s WAR-based Hall of Fame metric — catchers simply have not put up the same kind of numbers that players at other positions have. That’s likely because catching is such a physically demanding position and often results in injuries and shortened careers. It is, perhaps, not an adjustment voters have thought to make when considering Posada’s eligibility.

Furthermore, Posada’s quick ouster is somewhat due to the crowded ballot. Most voters had a hard time figuring out which 10 players to vote for. Had Posada been on the ballot in a different era, writers likely would have found it easier to justify voting for him.

Posada joins Kenny Lofton in the “unjustly one-and-done” group.

Tim Raines, Jeff Bagwell, Ivan Rodriguez Elected to the Hall of Fame

1990:  Outfielder Tim Raines of the Montreal Expos in action. Mandatory Credit: Otto Greule  /Allsport
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The 2017 induction class of the Baseball Hall of Fame was announced Wednesday evening and we have three inductees: Tim Raines, Jeff Bagwell and Ivan Rodriguez. Raines and Bagwell had to wait a good long while to get the call. Rodriguez is in on his first year of eligibility. But nowhere on the plaque will it say how long it took. All that matters now is that three of the greatest players of their respective generations finally have a place in Cooperstown.

Players must be named on 75% of the Baseball Writers Association of America’s ballots to get in. Raines was named on 86% of the ballots. Bagwell was named on 86.2%. Rodriguez was named on 76%. Non-inductees with significant vote totals include Trevor Hoffman at 74% and Vladimir Guerrero at  71.7%. The full results can be seen here.

Others not making the cut but still alive for next year, with vote totals in parenthesis: Edgar Martinez (58.6); Roger Clemens (54.1); Barry Bonds (53.8); Mike Mussina (51.8); Curt Schilling (45.0); Manny Ramirez (23.8); Larry Walker (21.9); Fred McGriff (21.7); Jeff Kent (16.7); Gary Sheffield (13.3%); Billy Wagner (10.2); and Sammy Sosa (8.6). Making his final appearance on the ballot was Lee Smith, who received 34.2% of the vote in his last year of eligibility. He will now be the business of the Veterans Committee.

Players who fell off the ballot due to not having the requisite 5% to stay on: Jorge Posada; Magglio Ordoñez; Edgar Renteria; Jason Varitek; Tim Wakefield; Casey Blake; Pat Burrell; Orlando Cabrera; Mike Cameron; J.D. Drew; Carlos Guillen; Derrek Lee; Melvin Mora; Arthur Rhodes; Freddy Sanchez; and Matt Stairs

We’ll have continued updates on today’s Hall of Fame vote throughout the evening and in the coming days. In the meantime, congratulations to this year’s inductees, Tim Raines, Jeff Bagwell and Ivan Rodriguez!