Now the Red Sox are asking about Ubaldo Jimenez


For those of you who don’t watch the HBT Daily videos, I made an analogy in this morning’s edition that I think explains the Ubaldo Jimenez trade rumors pretty well.

My dad had a 1985 Corvette once upon a time.  He really dug that car. Low mileage. No problems with it.  Once in a while, however, mostly out of boredom, he’d put a “For Sale” sign in the window and park it in the supermarket parking lot, seeing if he couldn’t get someone to make him a dumb offer.  It was highly unlikely that anyone was that dumb, but hey, if you never try, you’ll never be able to rip anyone off.

Anyway, that’s what I think is happening with Jimenez and the Rockies. They don’t really want to trade him. It makes little sense for them to do so.  But hey, if a team is going to give up a crap-ton of talent for him, why not? And how can you find that out unless you dangle him?

Against that backdrop, know that Danny Knobler reports that the Red Sox are asking about Jimenez now too.  Like the Yankees, they saw him at the Kroger parking lot and were probably curious how much they’d have to pay for him.  And then my dad/the Rockies told them some outrageous figure and it all ended there.  Or probably did.

I don’t think Jimenez gets traded, because no one is going to pay what that Corvette is worth. But selling him isn’t really the point.

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.