Did Francisco Rodriguez’s old agent really mess up? Or is this just classic Scott Boras?


Last week Francisco Rodriguez switched agents, going from Paul Kinzer to Scott Boras, and a few days later he was traded to the Brewers.  Today David Waldstein has a report in the New York Times in which he says that Kinzer never submitted a no-trade list to the Mets, with the suggestion that (a) Kinzer screwed up; and (b) the trade to the Brewers had to happen quickly to keep K-Rod from blocking it.

Which, I’m hearing, is kind of misleading.

I’m hearing that there may be a potential dispute about the timing and form of the no-trade list, but that Kinzer submitted one. However, and much more importantly, whether it was good enough to get the job done is a moot point and had no bearing on the trade to Milwaukee, because K-Rod would not have blocked a trade to Milwaukee.  To the contrary, both he and Boras thought Milwaukee was a great destination.  K-Rod made absolutely no objection to the trade when it happened and is eager to go there. Even if there was a no-trade issue, K-Rod has willingly and eagerly waived it.

And of course, given what we’re hearing about how K-Rod may even get to close for the Brewers, one gets the distinct sense that Milwaukee and Boras have something cooking about that big option of his. Because Doug Melvin isn’t suicidal. He would not allow K-Rod to close if it meant $14.5 million bucks next year.  No, Boras and K-Rod are quite pleased about Milwaukee and are likely finding that they can work quite well with the Brewers. With “well” meaning, K-Rod gets to pump up his closer stats and hit free agency this winter without fear of his old contract keeping him down.  An old contract, by the way, that would have meant a commission to Kinzer, not Boras, if it were triggered.

So why might Waldstein’s report have the swipe at Kinzer in it?  This is just speculation on my part, but Kinzer and Boras are heavy competitors. If you had a chance to kick a little dirt on a competitor, would you take the opportunity, even if there was no effective substance to the charge?  Wait — don’t answer that.  Just answer whether you think Scott Boras would.

Wade Miley exits spring start with groin strain

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Attempting to make a play on a bunt during Wednesday’s split-squad game against the Athletics, Brewers starter Wade Miley suffered a strained left groin, Tom Haudricourt of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports. Miley will undergo an MRI to determine the severity of the injury. On the afternoon, he gave up two runs on three hits and three walks with three strikeouts in four innings.

Miley, 31, signed a minor league contract with the Brewers last month. He had been having a solid spring until last Friday, when he served up seven runs in three innings against the Reds. The lefty had been battling for a spot in the Brewers’ rotation but this injury may take him out of the running.

Last season with the Orioles, Miley made 32 starts spanning 157 1/3 innings, posting a 5.61 ERA with a 142/93 K/BB ratio.

With the Jake Arrieta, Lance Lynn, and Alex Cobb signings recently, many wondered why the Brewers didn’t make a move. They may regret not having done more.

In related news, reliever Boone Logan also left with an injury on Wednesday, per Haudricourt. The Brewers should have more on both players’ statuses later.