The tax man is probably going to come to the fan who caught Jeter’s 3,000th hit

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You’ll recall that Christian Lopez, in exchange for giving Jeter back his 3,000th hit ball, got signed baseballs, bats, jerseys and, most significantly, Legends Suite tickets to the Yankees’ remaining home games and any playoff games this year. And that he did that instead of, you know, keeping the baseball, giving it to an auction house and then pocketing six figures for it.

Well, the New York Times broke out the calculator and talked to some tax experts in an effort to figure out how much that decision — as opposed to merely auctioning the thing off — might cost Mr. Lopez:

The tickets to the 32 remaining home games (after Sunday) have a combined face value of $44,800 to $73,600, according to the team’s Web site. The tickets could be worth a lot more if the Yankees play deep into October. Steven Bandini, a tax partner at the accounting firm Zapken & Loeb, said that if the items were valued modestly at $50,000, they would probably carry a tax burden of about $14,000.

Another tax guy the Times spoke to believed that these things could be characterized as gifts instead of prizes, in which case he wouldn’t have to pay taxes on them.  I’d certainly argue for that if I were Lopez, but if that doesn’t fly, he is at least thinking about how to deal with the taxes:

Mr. Lopez said if he had to pay taxes, he hoped he could borrow from his parents rather than sell his memorabilia.

That sound you hear is me repeatedly smacking my palm to my head. A little bit of it is also my heart breaking for this kid, but it’s mostly face-palming.

There is a suggestion toward the end of the article that the Yankees could perhaps step up and pay Lopez’s tax liabilities here. I’m not sure if that, in and of itself, would be taxable, so if you know accountants and/or tax lawyers, please chime in.

That’s all I got right now. If you need me, I’ll be busy contemplating the fungibility of cash, and wondering why more people don’t quite get this.

Athletics acquire Ryan LaMarre from Angels

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The Athletics acquired outfielder Ryan LaMarre from the Angels for cash considerations or a player to be named later, per a team announcement on Sunday. In a corresponding move, they placed right-hander Chris Bassitt on the 60-day disabled list and assigned the outfielder to Triple-A Nashville.

LaMarre, 28, signed a one-year contract with the Angels in November, but was designated for assignment last Tuesday in order to clear roster space for veteran catcher Juan Graterol. He batted .268/.375/.341 with two extra base hits and four stolen bases through 10 games in Triple-A Salt Lake.

The outfielder has not seen a major league assignment since 2016, when he appeared in six games with the Red Sox (three times in the outfield and once on the mound) and went 0-for-5 with a walk. He’s expected to give the A’s some depth in the minors and will join Andrew Lambo, Matt McBride, Kenny Wilson and Jaycob Brugman in Nashville’s outfield.

Blue Jays place Troy Tulowitzki on 10-day disabled list with strained hamstring

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Blue Jays’ shortstop Troy Tulowitzki is headed to the 10-day disabled list, club manager John Gibbons announced on Saturday. Tulowitzki left the eighth inning of Friday’s series opener when he injured his right hamstring in an attempt to steal third. Gibbons doesn’t have a concrete timetable for the infielder’s return, but told reporters that he doesn’t anticipate a lengthy recovery period.

Tulowitzki has battled numerous injuries before, from a serious quad strain to a chip fracture in his thumb, but this appears to be the first hamstring issue that has cropped up in his 12-year career. He’s the latest casualty on Toronto’s roster, which has lost Josh Donaldson, J.A. Happ, J.P. Howell, Dalton Pompey, Aaron Sanchez, Bo Schultz and Glenn Sparkman to various injuries in the last month. No official replacement has been named yet, though MLB.com’s Austin Laymance suggests that infielder Ryan Goins is ready to step in for Tulowitzki going forward.

Prior to his injury, Tulowitzki slashed .263/.295/.386 with one home run and a .681 OPS in 16 games with the Blue Jays. He went 1-for-3 on Friday with a base hit and a walk.