Scott Boras charmed the cargo shorts off the SABR crowd

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I won’t bore you with many details from my trip to the SABR convention in California last week–if for some insane reason you want the details, click here–but there was one interesting event actually related to baseball that seems particularly relevant to HBT.

Scott Boras (also known as “super agent Scott Boras”) gave the keynote speech prior to SABR’s annual business meeting Thursday morning, which I courageously attended at 8:30 a.m. Journalism!

Boras’ speech focused on the transition he made from college star and mediocre minor leaguer to one of the most powerful men in baseball and how he went from hitting .288 with a .738 OPS as an infielder at Single-A and Double-A to building a hugely successful agency that regularly makes use of sabermetrics and research.

We’ve certainly been critical of Boras, mostly for his hyperbolic hyping of clients and ability to manipulate certain media members, but he showed the type of charm and humor that makes it easy to understand how he’s able to talk star players into choosing him and general managers into signing his star players.

It also made me want to buy a used car.

At one point the lights in the ballroom dimmed and Boras didn’t skip a beat, quickly quipping that “SABR is a lot like the Dodgers, they don’t pay their bills either.”

He got big laughs throughout and even discussed the first time he realized as a young agent how much “managing the media” would help him, which would’ve gotten the biggest laugh of the entire 45-minute speech had Calcaterra been in attendance.

Jack Morris and Alan Trammell make the Hall of Fame on the Modern Era ballot

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The Modern Era ballot was revealed last month. The results have been announced on Sunday night. Jack Morris and Alan Trammell will be inducted into the Hall of Fame next summer.

Morris, now 62, pitched parts of 18 seasons in the majors, 14 of which were spent with the Tigers. He played on four championship teams: the 1984 Tigers, the 1991 Twins, and the 1992-93 Blue Jays. While his regular season stats weren’t terribly impressive beyond his 254 wins, Morris has always had a decent amount of Hall of Fame support due to his postseason performances. Morris shut the Braves out over 10 innings in Game 7 of the ’91 World Series. That being said, his postseason ERA of 3.80 isn’t far off his regular season ERA of 3.90. If you ask me, Morris doesn’t pass muster for the Hall of Fame. He now has the highest career ERA of any pitcher in the Hall.

Trammel, now 59, had been unjustly kept out of the Hall of Fame despite a terrific career. He hit .285/.352/.415 across parts of 20 seasons from 1977-96, all with the Tigers. He was regarded as a tremendous defender and made a memorable combination up the middle with Lou Whitaker, who also played with the Tigers from 1977-95. According to Baseball Reference, Trammell racked up 70.4 Wins Above Replacement during his career, which is slightly more than Hall of Famer Barry Larkin (70.2) and as much as Hall of Famer Ron Santo (70.4).

Steve Garvey, Tommy John, Don Mattingly, Dale Murphy, Dave Parker, Ted Simmons, Luis Tiant, and Marvin Miller were not elected to the Hall of Fame. Miller continuing to be shut out is a travesty. Craig has written at length here about Miller’s exclusion.