Clemens to challenge Congress’ authority to question him. Which is pretty darn rich.

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A lawyer for Roger Clemens said in court today that part of Clemens’ legal strategy would be to argue that the hearing that the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee held three years ago — the hearing in which he allegedly perjured himself —  had nothing to do with Congress’ responsibility for legislation and was therefore invalid.

Just to review, Clemens willingly agreed to testify before Congress. He wasn’t subpoenaed. At the time he and his legal team actually offered a bunch of “we’re happy for the chance to do this” bluster.  One would think that if he believed Congress’ authority wasn’t sufficient to hold such a hearing that he may have mentioned it three years ago.

That aside, Congress’ oversight and investigation powers are ridiculously broad. While not specifically enumerated in the Constitution, tradition and legal precedent has upheld Congress’ right to hold hearings on just about anything you can imagine, as long as the subject is something “on which legislation could be had or would be materially aided by the information which the investigation was calculated to elicit” or in an area that the executive branch regulates somehow. Given that there are tons of federal drug laws and entire federal agencies which deal with drugs and other controlled substances, a steroids investigation — while maybe not something you’d be a fan of — is safely within Congressional power.

So, hey, good luck with that Roger. Just don’t bank on any success there, OK?

Padres sign Jordan Lyles

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The Padres announced on Sunday that the club signed pitcher Jordan Lyles to a one-year major league contract with a club option for 2019. According to Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports, Lyles will earn $750,000 in 2018. Pitcher Travis Wood was designated for assignment to create room on the 40-man roster for Lyles.

Lyles, 27, had miserable results between the Rockies and Padres last season, compiling an aggregate 7.75 ERA with a 55/22 K/BB ratio over 69 2/3 innings. While he specifically gave up 24 earned runs in 23 innings across five starts with the Padres, it was a small sample. A full season at the pitcher-friendly Petco Park, as opposed to Colorado’s Coors Field, might help revitalize his career.

Wood, 30, went to the Padres at the non-waiver trade deadline from the Royals this past season. Overall, the lefty posted an aggregate 6.80 ERA with a 65/45 K/BB ratio in 94 innings. He’ll earn $6.5 million this season and has an $8 million mutual option with a $1 million buyout for 2019. So, the Padres are just eating $7.5 million minus the league minimum, assuming Wood latches on elsewhere.