Roger Clemens departs with his wife Debbie Clemens after the first day of his perjury trial, at the federal courthouse in Washington

Clemens to challenge Congress’ authority to question him. Which is pretty darn rich.

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A lawyer for Roger Clemens said in court today that part of Clemens’ legal strategy would be to argue that the hearing that the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee held three years ago — the hearing in which he allegedly perjured himself —  had nothing to do with Congress’ responsibility for legislation and was therefore invalid.

Just to review, Clemens willingly agreed to testify before Congress. He wasn’t subpoenaed. At the time he and his legal team actually offered a bunch of “we’re happy for the chance to do this” bluster.  One would think that if he believed Congress’ authority wasn’t sufficient to hold such a hearing that he may have mentioned it three years ago.

That aside, Congress’ oversight and investigation powers are ridiculously broad. While not specifically enumerated in the Constitution, tradition and legal precedent has upheld Congress’ right to hold hearings on just about anything you can imagine, as long as the subject is something “on which legislation could be had or would be materially aided by the information which the investigation was calculated to elicit” or in an area that the executive branch regulates somehow. Given that there are tons of federal drug laws and entire federal agencies which deal with drugs and other controlled substances, a steroids investigation — while maybe not something you’d be a fan of — is safely within Congressional power.

So, hey, good luck with that Roger. Just don’t bank on any success there, OK?

Corey Dickerson has lost 25 pounds

PORT CHARLOTTE, FL - FEBRUARY 25:  Corey Dickerson #10 of the Tampa Bay Rays poses for a photo during the Rays' photo day on February 25, 2016 at Charlotte Sports Park in Port Charlotte, Florida.  (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
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Corey Dickerson of the Tampa Bay Rays wasn’t a super huge guy or anything, but he’s going to be smaller this year: he told reporters today that he’s lost 25 pounds. He attributes it to a new diet and a workout regimen and says it’ll help him with his running, swing and throwing.

Dickerson had a down year in 2016, so if losing 25 pounds is something he thinks will work for him he’s got nothing to lose. Of course the best way for him to improve his numbers is to convince the Rays to trade him back to Colorado, but that’s not likely.

James McCann is in The Best Shape of His Life

Detroit Tigers catcher James McCann blows a bubble while warming up during a spring training baseball workout, Saturday, Feb. 27, 2016, in Lakeland, Fla. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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As I note every spring, “Best Shape of His Life” stories aren’t really about players being in The Best Shape of Their Lives. They’re about players and agents seeking to create positive stories.

We know this because the vast majority of Best Shape of His Life claims are about guys who were either injured the season before, guys who had subpar years the season before or players whose conditioning was a point of controversy the season before. These folks, or their agents + reporters who have little if nothing to write about in the offseason = BSOHL.

James McCann hurt his ankle last season and had a subpar year at the plate. So not only is he a perfect BSOHL candidate, he went old school with the claim and hit it right on the money, verbatim:

Spring training is less than a month away, folks!