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What they’re saying about Derek Jeter’s 3,000th hit…


Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter went 5-for-5 on Saturday at Yankee Stadium in an afternoon that won’t soon be forgotten by fans of baseball. He reached then quickly surpassed the 3,000-hit milestone, doing it in storybook fashion as the Yankees captured a 5-4 victory over the Rays.

Let’s swing it around the web for reaction to Jeter’s feat from those who know him best:

  • Current teammate Alex Rodriguez, via the New York Post: “Days like today remind you of the icon that this guy is. I’ve said it all along, 3,000 hits in a Yankee uniform for me, is like getting straight A’s at Harvard. He’s been a great student.”
  • Former teammate Bernie Williams, in a statement to “Congratulations, Jeet, on No. 3,000. … Just exhale, enjoy it, and know what an honor it was to be your teammate for so many years. Tonight, my last song is dedicated to you my friend.”
  • Part owner of the Yankees, Hal Steinbrenner, via USA Today: “Today we celebrate a remarkable individual achievement by one of the game’s greatest ambassadors. On behalf of the entire New York Yankees family, we congratulate Derek on his historic accomplishment.”
  • Yankees legend Yogi Berra, from ESPN New York: “I want to give him a big hug. It’s an absolute wonderful accomplishment.”
  • Former manager Joe Torre, via the New York Post: “We’ve been around him and watched him so long that nothing he does should surprise anybody. He’s always been a guy who was able to rise to the occasion. And . . . you know this is not an easy city to play in.”
  • Rap mogul and friend Jay-Z, from “That’s Derek Jeter for you. He’s just a winner. … He’s a great Yankee, definitely the top tier.”
  • Red Sox skipper Terry Francona, from “I’ve seen him since the Fall League when I think he was 19 years old. He’s still the same kid. A little different haircut, but always plays the game right. He always treats people right and he tries to beat your brains out. That’s a good way to go about things.”

Finally, I’d implore you to read Joe Posnanski’s take on Saturday afternoon’s events over at Sports Illustrated. As with most things Posnanski writes, it’s a masterpiece. “On Saturday, he played young again.”

The Yankees Wild Card Game roster is set

Luis Severino
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Wild Card teams get to set their roster for the one-and-done game and then reset it for the Division Series if they advance. As such, you sometimes see some weirdness with the wild card roster. The Yankees, who just set theirs for tonight’s game, are no exception.

Masahiro Tanaka will be tonight’s starter, but Luis Severino, also a starter, will be around as well in case Tanaka gets knocked out early and they need more innings. In all, the Yankees are carrying nine pitchers and three catchers. In addition, they have Rob Refsnyder, Slade Heathcott, and pinch-runner Rico Noel as bench players. In case you forgot, pinch running can matter a lot in a Wild Card Game.

Jarrod Dyson Gif

Anyway, here’s the whole roster:

CC Sabathia’s bad weekend in Baltimore made him choose rehab

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It was inevitable that someone would report on what, specifically, was going on with CC Sabathia in the run up to his decision to go into rehab yesterday. And today we have that story, at least in the broad strokes, from the New York Post.

Speaking to an anonymous source close to Sabathia, the Post reports that the Yankees’ starter more or less went on a bender from Thursday into Friday and continued on to Saturday, which resulted in his Sunday afternoon phone call to Brian Cashman in which he said he needed help.

Notable detail: Sabathia is referred to as “not a big drinker” in the story. Which is something worth thinking about when you think of others who have trouble with alcohol. It’s not always about massive or constant consumption. It’s about the person’s relationship with substances that is the real problem. Many who drink a good deal are totally fine. Many who don’t drink much do so in problematic ways and patterns. For this reason, and many others, it’s useful to avoid engaging in cliches and stereotypes of addicts.