Gordon Beckham calls Chris Getz gay

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But it was all in the name of love.

With the White Sox and Royals playing earlier this week, Gordon Beckham decided to leave a message in the infield dirt for his fellow second baseman, former teammate and good friend Chris Getz.

“GETZ IS GAY! GB”

It never got picked up by the tv cameras, but fans noticed and a controversy has slowly been brewing.

“Wow,” Beckham said when asked about it by Rick Telander of the Chicago Sun-Times. “Chris is one of my best friends. It was a joke. I didn’t know anybody could see. I didn’t mean anything, you know?”

Of course, it didn’t. Beckham didn’t intend any harm.  But it was a stupid act, and in the times that we live in, any major league baseball player should know better.

White Sox GM Ken Williams agreed:

But I’m just disappointed for this to come on the heels of the Kobe Bryant thing, and [Joakim] Noah, and, yes, a number of years ago, the issue with Ozzie [Guillen]. There just needs to be a greater awareness of when you’re in the public eye. Something between two friends meant as a joke? Well, you’re representing not just yourself, but your team, your sport, your family.

The organization didn’t do it. He did it. He should apologize for making us less than what we stand for.

Beckham did apologize through the Sun-Times, and he’ll probably have to apologize at least a couple of more times before the issue melts away.  He appears to be terribly embarrassed by the whole thing, and it’s clear he won’t be making any similar mistakes again.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.