Report: Dodgers fire hopeful owner Steve Garvey

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Stunning, isn’t it, that lobbying to buy your boss’s business that he has no interest in selling might undermine your job security?

Steve Garvey had been affiliated with the Dodgers for about 30 of the last 40 years, but he’s out on his own now after being let go by Frank McCourt, The Associated Press reported Friday.

The reason seems obvious: Garvey has partnered with another former Dodger, Orel Hershiser, to form a group that’s hopeful of buying the Dodgers if McCourt is forced to sell.

Garvey had spent the last 15 years working in Community Affairs for the Dodgers, his job mostly involving smiling in front of cameras, shaking hands with sponsors and maybe making some phone calls to season-ticket holders.

Neither Garvey nor the Dodgers have commented on the reported dismissal.

12:50 a.m. EDT: Garvey confirmed to 710 ESPN Radio that he was fired. He didn’t have anything else to say on the subject.

2:00 a.m. EDT: Garvey broke his silence late Friday night, expressing his disappointment with the Dodgers’ decision.

In an email statement to The AP, he said:

I was always clear with management as to the exploratory ownership group I’ve put together. In fact, I twice offered a significant cash infusion to help the team. I met with team officials on multiple occasions, and was given parameters of what was appropriate for me to say regarding my investment group. I feel I stayed within those parameters.

Garvey also stated that whether he’s an employee or not, he’ll always be a Dodger.

Royals sign Michael Saunders to a minor-league deal

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Free agent outfielder Michael Saunders has agreed to a minor-league contract with the Royals, the team announced Friday. While the move comes just two days after Saunders agreed to terms with the Pirates, he allegedly asked for his release after the club acquired outfielder Corey Dickerson in a multi-player swap with the Rays on Thursday. MLB.com’s Jeffrey Flanagan adds that Saunders will make $1.5 million upon reaching the majors, with a potential $500,000 in bonuses.

After earning his first spot on an All-Star team in 2016, Saunders followed up a solid campaign with a career-worst performance in 2017. The 31-year-old split the season between the Phillies and Blue Jays’ camps, batting a combined .202/.256/.344 with six home runs and -0.7 fWAR in 234 plate appearances. Although he remained healthy throughout the year, with no sign of the lingering hamstring strain that has plagued him on and off since 2013, he wasn’t productive enough to merit a full-time role on either roster.

With Dickerson slated for a starting role in Pittsburgh, it was unlikely that Saunders would have commanded anything other than a backup role in 2018. Now, however, he’ll compete for playing time amid a slew of outfield options, including Alex Gordon, Cody Asche, Jorge Bonifacio, Tyler Collins and Paulo Orlando.