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And now a few words about comments at HBT

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A bit of housekeeping. This time about comments.

One thing I take a bit of pride in is that, for a large website, our comments are pretty good. Oh, sure, there’s some jackassery going on below the fold in every post — and if you simply don’t like comments on blogs on general principle, the HBT comments aren’t so different that they’re going to change your mind — but they’re pretty solid. They tend to be on topic. They’re often pretty funny. It ain’t the Algonquin Roundtable, but I’d put their quality up against what you see at some other major sports websites and would be pretty confident that HBT’s are a cut above.

When I woke up this morning and read the thread about the fan’s death at The Ballpark in Arlington, however, I was pretty disappointed to see that a commenter had left some pretty offensive stuff.  It’s gone now — I deleted his comments and banned the commenter — but I’m pretty angry about it all the same. This wasn’t some guy who surfed on and left a one-shot jerk comment. It was someone who has been around here a while.

Our commenting rules are pretty permissive. We don’t shoot down comments or ban commenters simply for being idiots. Or for using bad language. Or for being insensitive or controversial. It’s actually good when people argue or disagree about things or when others are taken out of their comfort zone. That’s when you learn things. And no one has the right to go through life without having their sensibilities offended from time to time. So the last thing I want is for some phony level politeness, some hyper-orthodoxy or some brand of groupthink to rule the comments. Mix it up, and if you can’t stand the heat, get out of the kitchen.

But there are some simple rules that should go without saying. I’ll say them anyway. I won’t tolerate the following:

  • Racism;
  • Misogyny;
  • Homophobia or gay bashing;
  • Antisemitism;
  • Excessive personal attacks on other commenters.

This doesn’t mean you can’t talk about religion, homosexuality or gender issues. It doesn’t mean you can’t be critical of other commenters. And an honest slip-up, a poor attempt at humor, sharp irony or a simple misunderstanding among commenters that touches on these things will be given latitude because we all make a mistake from time to time.

But I will not tolerate this stuff when it is clear, has no redeeming value and especially when it is infused with ire.  You’ve all been to school or have jobs. You know what flies in a social setting and what doesn’t. And if you ignore that — or simply can’t figure it out — your contributions aren’t really wanted around here anyway.

I don’t ban people often, but I will ban you for these sorts of transgressions. You don’t get three strikes. You don’t necessarily even get a warning. There is no formal appeals process. Behave yourselves, or be gone. It’s pretty simple.

Sincerely,

The Management

Red Sox set a new major league record with 11 strikeouts in a row

BALTIMORE, MD - SEPTEMBER 20: Starting pitcher Eduardo Rodriguez #52 of the Boston Red Sox works the first inning against the Baltimore Orioles at Oriole Park at Camden Yards on September 20, 2016 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)
Patrick Smith/Getty Images
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Lost in the nifty base running by Dustin Pedroia that won Sunday’s game against the Rays, the Red Sox set a new major league record by striking out 11 batters in a row, per Peter Abraham of The Boston Globe. Starter Eduardo Rodriguez struck out the final six Rays he faced and reliever Heath Hembree struck out five Rays in a row after that. Tom Seaver had the previous consecutive strikeout streak of 10, set on April 22, 1970 against the Padres.

The Red Sox also set a team record with 23 strikeouts in total: 13 by Rodriguez, five by Hembree, one by Matt Barnes, and four by Joe Kelly. Per Abraham, that’s the most strikeouts in a 10-inning game since at least 1913 and the most in a game of any length since 2004.

For Rodriguez, Sunday marked the first double-digit strikeout game of his career. He has pitched quite well since returning to the rotation at the start of the second half. Over 13 starts, the lefty has a 3.10 ERA with a 70/23 K/BB ratio in 72 2/3 innings.

Dodgers clinch NL West on Charlie Culberson’s walk-off home run

WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 20: Charlie Culberson #6 of the Los Angeles Dodgers runs to first base after hitting a single RBI in the second inning against the Washington Nationals at Nationals Park on July 20, 2016 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Matt Hazlett/Getty Images)
Matt Hazlett/Getty Images
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Dodgers second baseman Charlie Culberson delivered a walk-off solo home run in the bottom of the 10th inning, clinching the NL West for the Dodgers on Sunday afternoon. What a way to celebrate Vin Scully’s final home game behind the microphone.

The Dodgers were trailing 2-1 in the seventh inning, but shortstop Corey Seager tripled in a run to tie the game. Rockies outfielder David Dahl untied the game in the top of the ninth with a two-out solo home run off of Kenley Jansen. But Seager once again rose to the occasion, blasting a game-tying solo shot in the bottom half of the ninth against Adam Ottavino. That would set the stage for Culberson in the next frame.

Culberson, a former Rockie, came into the afternoon with a .591 OPS and zero home runs in 53 plate appearances. He finished the afternoon 3-for-5 with the homer.

It’s the fourth consecutive season in which the Dodgers have won the NL West. The Cubs have clinched the best record, which means they’ll play the winner of the Wild Card game. The Dodgers will play the Nationals in the NLDS. The Nationals have a 1.5-game lead over the Dodgers for home-field advantage, so both teams are still playing for something of importance in the regular season’s final week.