Derek Jeter’s 3,000 hits: the victims


It shouldn’t take anyone more than a couple of guesses to figure out which pitcher Derek Jeter has the most of his 3,000 hits against.  It is, of course, the one pitcher who has has been on a rival AL East team for the entire duration of Jeter’s career.

Here are the 12 pitchers Jeter has at least 20 hits against:

1. Tim Wakefield – 34-for-130 – .279/.315/.402
2. Pedro Martinez – 29-for-107 – .271/.350/.439
3. Sidney Ponson – 29-for-81 – .358/.402/.580
4. Rodrigo Lopez – 26-for-61 – .426/.493/.672
5. Josh Beckett – 25-for-83 – .301/.358/.422
6. Jamie Moyer – 23-for-74 – .311/.354/.432
7. Aaron Sele – 23-for-72 – .319/.367/.403
8. Roy Halladay – 22-for-94 – .234/.294/.277
9. John Lackey – 21-for-72 – .292/.378/.417
9. Derek Lowe – 21-for-73 – .288/.342/.301
9. David Wells – 21-for-67 – .313/.324/.522
12. Curt Schilling – 20-for-68 – .294/.324/.397

Nine of the 12 pitched for the Red Sox, though Moyer was with Boston only briefly, going 7-1 for the team in 1996. Most of Jeter’s hits off him came while he was with the Mariners.

Some other notables:

Cliff Lee – 19-for-47 – .404/.462/.553
Johan Santana – 19-for-43 – .442/.478/.628
CC Sabathia – 13-for-29 – .448/.484/.552
Greg Maddux – 12-for-26 – .462/.500/.462
Hideo Nomo – 12-for-20 – .600/.680/.800

Jeter has fared quite well against some terrific hurlers.  It goes hand in hand with his strong postseason performance.  Jeter has an approach and swing that has tended to make him just as effective against great pitchers as he is against mediocrities.

Jeter has hit 1.000 against 78 different pitchers. Most of those are in one or two at-bats, of course, but he’s 4-for-4 against Dennys Reyes, Matt Riley (with two homers) and Bob Tewksbury. He’s also 5-for-6 against longtime teammate Ramiro Mendoza and 7-for-10 against Jeremy Sowers.

The most at-bats Jeter has against anyone without picking up a hit is 14. He’s 0-for-14 against former Orioles reliever Jorge Julio, 0-for-11 against Casey Janssen and 0-for-9 against Rick Porcello.

Among pitchers he’s faced a bit more, he’s fared particular poorly against Ricky Romero (2-for-20), Jered Weaver (3-for-23), John Smoltz (2-for-18) and Scott Kazmir (7-for-45).

His worst OPS against any pitcher, min. 20 at-bats, is Travis Harper (.374), followed by Danys Baez (.382), Joaquin Benoit (.399) and Jon Garland (.442).

The best, using the same min, is Nomo (1.480) followed by Eric Milton (1.342), Ervin Santana (1.284) and the late Joe Kennedy (1.253).

Giants fans will have to pay a surcharge to park at Athletics games

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Athletics president Dave Kaval is ready to take full advantage of the interleague series between the Giants and A’s this season. While the two teams customarily play a few preseason “Battle of the Bay” games each year, they’re also scheduled to meet each other six times during the regular season; once for a three-game set in San Francisco, then for a three-game set in Oakland. On Saturday, Kaval announced that any Giants fans looking to park at the Coliseum this year will be charged $50 instead of the standard, general admission $30 — an additional “rivalry fee” that can be easily waived by shouting, “Go A’s!” at the gate.

This isn’t the first time that a major-league team has tried to keep rival fans at bay, though Kaval doesn’t seem all that intent on actually driving fans away from the ballpark. Back in 2012, the Nationals staged a “Take Back the Park” campaign after people began complaining that Phillies fans were overtaking Nationals Park during rivalry games. They limited a single-series presale of Nats-Phillies tickets to buyers within Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia in hopes of filling the stands with a few more friendly faces. Washington COO Andy Feffer told the press that while he would treat all guests with “respect and courtesy,” he wanted Phillies fans to feel irked enough to pay attention to the Nationals. In the end, things went… well, a little south for all involved.

Whether the Giants are planning any retaliatory measures has yet to be seen, but it’s not as if this is going to be an enforceable rule. The real travesty here, if you’re an A’s fan or just pretending to be one, is that the parking fees have increased from $20 to $30 this season. Unless you’re a season ticket holder with a prepaid $10 parking permit, it’s far better to brave the crowds and take advantage of local public transportation. There are bound to be far fewer irate Giants fans on BART than at the gates — even if the gag only lasts a few days out of the year.