Red Sox survive after blown call at home plate

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What looked like an easy win for the Red Sox suddenly got tense Tuesday, after Jonathan Papelbon came into a 3-0 game and gave up a two-run homer to Jose Bautista with none out in the ninth.

Papelbon went on to surrender a single to Edwin Encarnacion with one out, a walk to J.A. Arencibia with two outs and then a John McDonald single to left that seemed poised to tie the game.  The reason it didn’t is because Jason Varitek threw his left foot in front of home plate, blocking Encarnacion’s path to the base.

Sure enough, Varitek blocked Encarnacion’s left foot from the plate.  However, Encarnacion’s right foot, trailing the left, clearly touched home before Varitek could apply the tag.  Umpire Brian Knight called him out anyway, giving the Red Sox a 3-2 victory.

Despite losing Jon Lester to a strained lat after four innings, the Red Sox took a no-hitter into the sixth, when Bautista singled to break it up.  The Jays had just two hits through eight before collecting four against Papelbon in the ninth.

It was the first time this season that Papelbon had given up four hits in an appearance, and he allowed his first runs since June 4.  He’s 18-for-19 saving games this season despite a rather bloated 4.02 ERA.

Dustin Pedroia homered for Boston.

Report: Blue Jays sign Curtis Granderson to one-year, $5 million deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reported on Monday night that the Blue Jays have signed outfielder Curtis Granderson to a one-year, $5 million deal. The contract is pending a physical and includes performance incentives.

Granderson, who turns 37 years old in March, spent last season with the Mets and Dodgers, batting an aggregate .212/.323/.452 with 26 home runs and 64 RBI in 527 plate appearances. He struggled offensively after going to the Dodgers, mustering a paltry .654 OPS. He went 1-for-15 in the playoffs as well.

The Blue Jays will likely platoon Granderson in the corner outfield. His career OPS is 158 points higher versus right-handed pitchers than against left-handers.