Phillies pitching coach doesn’t want Roy Halladay starting All-Star Game

15 Comments

The way it works in All-Star Games these days is that the starting pitcher throws two innings, while everyone else throws one at the max.  For that reason, Phillies pitching coach Rich Dubee doesn’t want to see Roy Halladay start for the NL squad.

As Dubee told the Philadelphia Inquirer:

You’re looking at a guy that’s leading the league in innings pitched by a pretty good size. I don’t know that you can deny [the starting job]. It would be an honor. But at the same time, this guy is taking on a big workload again, like he always does. We’ll wait and see what happens.

Halladay didn’t sound particularly excited about starting either:

Obviously you go there to pitch and that’s the main idea, but there are definitely other guys that are worthy of it. Whether they ask me or not I don’t know. The only thing I always try to keep in mind is how is this going to affect me going forward? Obviously starting you have to pitch longer than if you come in later. Not that it’s always in your control, but it’s just things you consider and you talk over with the staff here.

Anyway, it sounds like the Phillies as a whole would be just fine with Jair Jurrjens or even one of the Giants pitchers getting the start.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.