Ever wonder how the Yankees would fare if they called Citi Field home?

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The answer? Not nearly as well, at least from a power perspective.

This isn’t shocking information, given that Yankee Stadium obviously caters to power, particularly to right field, while Citi Field is more pitcher-friendly, but the Wall Street Journal crunched the actual numbers.

With the help of HitTrackerOnline’s Greg Rybarczyk and the ESPN Stats and Information Group, they looked at every home run hit at the new Yankee Stadium by seven prominent members of the Yankees’ regular lineup, including Alex Rodriguez, Mark Teixeira, Derek Jeter, Curtis Granderson, Robinson Cano, Nick Swisher and Jorge Posada.

They found that of the 242 homers hit by the seven players at Yankee Stadium since its debut in 2009, only 120 (49.6%) would have cleared the fence at Citi Field, assuming average weather conditions. The player affected the most? Derek Jeter. Just four of his 20 homers would have left Citi Field. And none to the opposite field.

As for Alex Rodriguez, he would have lost 41 percent of his home runs if he played his home games at Citi Field. We saw this first-hand last night, as Rodriguez hit a mammoth shot to left-center field in the ninth inning that would have been a home run at just about any other ballpark. But thanks to the “Great Wall of Flushing,” he had to settle for an RBI double.

There has been some clamoring for the Mets to move the fences in, but I’m not entirely convinced that minor alterations would make that much of a difference. Rybarczyk said as much in a study he did last month. If cutting the left field fence in half would help some of the hitters psychologically (I’m talking to you, Jason Bay), I suppose I could see some advantage to that. However, I actually enjoy the fact that Citi Field and Yankee Stadium are so vastly different.

Report: Diamondbacks acquire Steven Souza from Rays; Yankees land Brandon Drury

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Update (6:35 PM ET): This is a three-team deal also involving the Diamondbacks, per Nick Piecoro of the Arizona Republic. The Diamondbacks will receive outfielder Steven Souza from the Rays and second baseman Brandon Drury will head to the Yankees. Lefty reliever Anthony Banda will go to the Rays, Piecoro adds. The Diamondbacks will also receive prospect Taylor Widener from the Yankees, per Joel Sherman of the New York Post. MLB.com’s Steve Gilbert adds that the Rays will get two players to be named later from the D-Backs.

Souza, 28, is earning $3.55 million in his first of three years of arbitration eligibility, so the Rays are presumably saving money in moving him. Last season, Souza hit a productive .239/.351/.459 with 30 home runs, 78 RBI, 78 runs scored, and 16 stolen bases in 617 plate appearances. Souza’s arrival almost certainly pushes Yasmany Tomas out of a starting gig.

Drury, 25, has played a handful of positions in his brief major league career. Last year, he played second base in Arizona, batting .267/.317/.447 with 13 home runs and 63 RBI in 480 PA.

Banda, 24, made his major league debut last season, posting an ugly 5.96 ERA with a 25/10 K/BB ratio in 25 2/3 innings. The peripherals suggest he pitched better than his ERA indicated.

Widener, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the 12th round of the 2016 draft. This past season with High-A Tampa, he pitched 119 1/3 innings and posted a 3.39 ERA with a 129/50 K/BB ratio. MLB Pipeline rated Widener as the 14th-best prospect in the Yankees’ system.

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Robert Murray of FanRag Sports reports that the Rays will acquire second base prospect Nick Solak from the Yankees. The Yankees’ return is presently not known.

Solak, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the second round of the 2016 draft. He spent last season between High-A Tampa and Double-A Trenton, hitting a combined .297/.384/.452 with 12 home runs, 53 RBI, 72 runs scored, and 14 stolen bases.

MLB Pipeline ranked Solak as the eighth-best prospect in the Yankees’ system and the fifth-best second base prospect in baseball, praising him for his ability to hit line drives as well as his speed.