Frank McCourt notices the depositions of Bud Selig, other MLB executives

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One of the questions I keep getting asked by radio hosts and others is how the Dodgers’ bankruptcy differs from that of the Rangers or the Cubs.  My answer is that, unlike those bankruptcies, this is really an adversarial action more than a reorganizational kind of thing.

This is the sort of reason why: Frank McCourt intends to take the depositions of Selig and six other Major League Baseball executives in the next couple of weeks. The purpose: to establish that it was baseball’s intent to whack McCourt and seize the Dodgers all along.*

And hell, maybe it was. Guess they’ll have to ask Selig about it.  What I can’t understand, however, is the direct significance this would have on the bankruptcy. By the filing itself, McCourt is admitting he can’t pay his bills. While it’s possible that he’ll convince someone that baseball was out to get him, in the end, the court is there to determine what is in the best interests of the Dodgers’ creditors, not who was more righteous in the leadup to last week’s filing.

Or am I missing something here?

 

*Pfun Pfact: McCourt’s lawyers misspelled Bud Selig’s real first name — Allan — three times on the depo notice. That’s some fine lawyerin’ there, Lou.

Yankees reliever Tommy Kahnle could miss three weeks

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The Yankees announced a few minutes ago that reliever Tommy Kahnle has biceps and shoulder tendinitis. The prescription: no throwing for about 10 days. Manager Aaron Boone thinks Kahnle will miss about three weeks in total.

Kahnle was placed on the disabled list the other day following a series of subpar outings characterized by a drop in his fastball velocity. He’s allowed seven runs — five earned — on four hits and has issued eight walks in seven and a third innings. He’s clearly not the same guy he was last season when, following his trade to New York from Chicago, he put up a 2.70 ERA and struck out 12.2 batters per nine innings in 32 games.