Jerry Hairston blames broken wrist on late-afternoon start time

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UPDATE: So much for avoiding the DL. Bill Ladson of MLB.com reports that Hairston will indeed be put on the shelf and is expected to miss 2-4 weeks.

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Jerry Hairston Jr. suffered what the Nationals are calling a “small break” in his left wrist when he was hit by a Dan Haren pitch during yesterday afternoon’s game, but the veteran utility man hopes to play through the injury.

Adam Kilgore of the Washington Post reports that Hairston will be examined today by a doctor, so he may end up not having much choice in the matter if a disabled list stint is advised.

Hairston blamed the late-afternoon start time for the injury, explaining how tough it is to pick up the baseball coming out of a pitcher’s hand because of shadows:

Somebody’s going to get really, really hurt. He could have hit my head. Really difficult to pick up the ball, so it’s going to take something serious to change. I’ve got a broken wrist. It could have been way worse. What if he hit me in the face? It’s just terrible. It’s irresponsible. Maybe they think they draw another 5,000 or so, I don’t know, it’s just terrible. The pitchers at this level are too good.

Hairston has played 14 seasons in the majors, so he’d know better than most, but 4:00 pm start times for games are hardly rare and there isn’t a rash of plunkings stemming from them.

Arizona Diamondbacks, Tony La Russa part ways

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The Arizona Diamondbacks just announced that they are parting ways with Tony La Russa at the end of the month.

La Russa served as the club’s “Chief Baseball Officer” from 2015-16. For the last year he was styled “Chief Baseball Analyst.” That’s a nice way to saying that he was pushed aside when the club fired his hand-picked general manager Dave Stewart and brought in Mike Hazen to run the club a year ago. La Russa was stripped of his powers, but was told he could hang around as an advisor. Most didn’t think he’d actually take the club up on that offer, but he did. By all accounts he was a pretty unobtrusive presence around the team this year, offering counsel and insight when asked but not making things awkward the way having the old boss around might do.

I suppose that can only last so long, however. The Dbacks had considerably more success without La Russa in charge in 2017 than they had with him in charge the previous couple of years. At some point you just part ways. That point is now.