Chris Davis is hitting .374 with 19 homers and 52 RBIs in 33 games at Triple-A

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Chris Davis hit well in limited action with Texas earlier this season, but the Rangers don’t seem particularly interested in giving him another extended opportunity. So instead he’s destroying Triple-A pitching.

Davis has hit .374 with 19 homers and 52 RBIs in 33 games at Triple-A. Admittedly the Pacific Coast League is very hitter-friendly and that monstrous production comes with Davis’ usual lack of strike-zone control in the form of a 41/9 K/BB ratio, but his OPS is a ridiculous 1.300.

Including his previous Triple-A stints Davis has now hit .335 with a 1.000 OPS in 211 games there, so at this point it seems pretty obvious that the 25-year-old has nothing left to prove in the minors. Unfortunately in the majors he’s hit just .231 with a .701 OPS in 179 games since his strong half-season debut in 2008, striking out 208 times in 612 trips to the plate.

Davis explained during spring training that he’d rather be traded than head back to Triple-A and the Rangers didn’t oblige then, but whether they call him up or start shopping him around it’ll be tough to simply keep him stashed in the minors for much longer.

Aaron Judge was involved in a weird play in the fourth inning

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Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge found himself front-and-center in a weird play in the bottom of the fourth inning during Game 4 of the ALCS on Tuesday evening. Judge drew a walk to lead off the frame. After Didi Gregorius lined out, Gary Sanchez flied out to shallow right-center.

Judge must have thought the ball had a high probability of falling in for a hit, so he was past the second base bag around the time he realized his mistake. He retraced his steps, running back to first base. Reddick’s throw hopped a couple of times but first base umpire Jerry Meals called Judge out on the tag-up play.

Manager Joe Girardi requested a review and the call was overturned: Judge was safe. However, Astros manager A.J. Hinch wanted to challenge that Judge did not re-touch second base on his way back. Rather than issuing a formal challenge, the Astros had to appeal the play by having starter Lance McCullers throw to second base, at which point second base umpire Jim Reynolds would issue a ruling. McCullers was a bit hasty, though, and made his appeal throw before Greg Bird stepped into the batter’s box. Reynolds told McCullers that he had to wait. So, McCullers again made his appeal throw.

This time, Judge was running and he was simply tagged out at second base for the final out of the inning. No need for a review.

As Ken Rosenthal explained on the FS1 broadcast, the Yankees were trying to “beat the police.” They knew Judge would have been ruled out — replays clearly showed he never re-touched the base — so they had nothing to lose by sending Judge. If he was safe, the Astros would no longer be able to appeal the play. If he’s out, then it’s the same outcome they would have had anyway.