Manny Ramirez is the Dodgers’ biggest creditor

28 Comments

Whenever you file for bankruptcy, you have to file a list of your creditors.  The Dodgers filed theirs — see the whole filing here — and it’s a fun list:

  • Manny Ramirez, $20,992,086
  • Andruw Jones, $11,075,000
  • Hiroki Kuroda, $4,483,516
  • Rafael Furcal, $3,725,275
  • Chicago White Sox, $3,500,000
  • Ted Lilly, $3,423,077
  • Zach Lee, $3,400,000
  • Kaz Ishii, $3,300,000
  • Juan Uribe, $3,241,758
  • Matt Guerrier, $3,090,659

Other creditors include: Marquis Grissom — who hasn’t played for the Dodgers forever — and Vin Scully, who is owed $152,778.  I don’t care if the other guys get stiffed, but if Scully doesn’t get paid, I’m takin’ a blowtorch to Frank’s mansion. One of ’em anyway.

My favorite part, of course, is that Manny Ramirez is the top creditor. Someone can correct me if I’m wrong, but it’s my understanding that creditors usually have to make legal appearances in bankruptcy proceedings. I can’t wait to see Manny’s legal filings. I assume that they’ll be hand-written, in either crayon or with the burnt end of a pizza crust, on letterhead from hotel on the planet Mars.  And he’ll send it via some sort of royal courier. Or by carrier pigeon.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

Getty Images
3 Comments

The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

Matthew Stockman/Getty Images
1 Comment

If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.