White Sox place John Danks on 15-day DL with oblique strain

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White Sox left-hander John Danks was pulled in the second inning of Saturday’s game against the Nationals with a strained left oblique. He felt no improvement on Sunday morning when he arrived back at U.S. Cellular Field and so the Chicago front office made the only decision it could.

From Doug Padilla of ESPN Chicago comes word that Danks has been placed on the 15-day disabled list, with left-hander Hector Santiago joining the White Sox in a corresponding roster move.

Danks went 0-8 with a 5.25 ERA over his first 11 starts of the season, but he’s been far steadier since the beginning of June, allowing just three earned runs in his last 23 2/3 innings. That mini hot streak will have to be put on hold for the next three or four weeks.

The White Sox enter Sunday’s action with a disappointing 38-40 record, but they’re only three games behind the Indians and Tigers for first place in the American League Central. It’ll be a race to the finish.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”