Delmon Young carted off, placed on DL with ankle sprain

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Twins left fielder Delmon Young had to be carted off the field moments ago at Milwaukee’s Miller Park after smashing his right leg against the wall on a Yuniesky Betancourt inside-the-park home run.

Young took a bad route on Betancourt’s deep fly ball and looked to suffer a serious injury when his leg met the out-of-town scoreboard along the left field wall. He was replaced in the Minnesota lineup by Luke Hughes, who took over at first base with Michael Cuddyer shifting to the outfield.

Young, 25, was 0-for-2 in the game before exiting. He’s batting just .256/.281/.324 with two home runs and 20 RBI in 217 plate appearances this season. The Twins should provide an update shortly.

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UPDATE, 9:31 PM: According to Joe Christensen of the Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Young has been diagnosed only with a right ankle sprain. Initial X-rays did not show any type of fracture.

UPDATE, 10:37 PM: Young has now been placed on the 15-day disabled list, according to Phil Mackey of ESPN 1500 AM. Rene Tosoni has been recalled to take his spot on the 25-man roster.

Yankees to hire Josh Bard as their new bench coach

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Aaron Boone has no experience as a coach or a manager at any level. As such, some have speculated that he’d hire a more seasoned hand as his bench coach as he begins his first season as Yankees manager. Someone like, say, Eric Wedge, who was a candidate for the job Boone got and who once managed Boone in Cleveland.

Nope. According to MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand, he’s going with Josh Bard.

Bard, 39, was a teammate of Boone’s with the Indians in 2005. He’s not without coaching experience, having spent the last two seasons as the Dodgers’ bullpen coach, but he’s not that Gene Lamont/Don Zimmer-type we often see in the bench coach role.

Which is fine because different managers want different things from their bench coach. Some are strategy guys, helping with in-game decision making. Others are relationship guys who help managers understand all of the dynamics of the clubhouse while they’re worrying more about lineups and stuff. Others are trust guys, who can serve as the manager’s sounding board, among other things. Some are combinations of all of these things. As Feinsand notes in his story, Boone said at his introductory press conference that he’s looking for this:

“I want smart sitting next to me. I want confidence sitting next to me. I want a guy who can walk out into that room and as I talk about relationships I expect to have with my players, I expect that even to be more so with my coaching staff. Whether that is a guy with all kinds of experience or little experience. I am not concerned about that.”