Matt Joyce, Evan Longoria

The Rays need to get out of Tampa Bay

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I don’t know that I know enough myself to make such a judgment, but that’s the judgment of ESPN’s Steve Berthiaume, who writes what I feel to be a fairly accurate and even-handed assessment of the problems facing the Rays in St. Petersburg, concluding thusly:

Again: This is not about assigning blame. Nobody is a bad person for not attending a baseball game. Even with 30 new ballparks one major league team would still have to be last in attendance, and even with a new stadium on the Tampa side, there is nothing to suggest that team wouldn’t be the Rays. The Tampa Bay area is a great place. It just hasn’t been a great place for Major League Baseball to do business.

The most compelling argument against the Rays’ viability in the Tampa Bay area that I’ve heard is the argument that, overall regional population aside, it’s a population that is really spread out in terms of miles from the ballpark. And that’s even before you factor in the bridges and other demographic considerations. At some point, you either feel like you have a ballpark nearby or you don’t, and the bulk of the population in the Tampa Bay Area apparently views the Rays as playing far away from them, in a location that isn’t worth the bother of reaching.

Of course, there are no easy solutions. There are very few if any cities that would be sure-things from a business perspective if the Rays were to relocate. Some would be better than St. Petersburg, but no sure things.

It strikes me that the best bet to ensure the financial viability of the franchise would be to move it into an area that is already part of the claimed territory of an existing team, such as Brooklyn or the New York suburbs. Inland Empire, California. That kind of thing. Such a move would certainly upset apple carts, but it would also reflect the population trends of the past few decades, and those trends are something to which baseball has always, eventually, had to adhere.

Report: Rockies haven’t discussed contract extension with Nolan Arenado

LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 23: Nolan Arenado #28 of the Colorado Rockies runs the bases after hitting a solo homerun in the sixth inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Dodger Stadium on September 23, 2016 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Lisa Blumenfeld/Getty Images)
Lisa Blumenfeld/Getty Images
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In a mailbag published on Thursday, Patrick Saunders of the Denver Post says he has spoken with Arenado and his agent from the Wasserman Media Group. Based on that, he says the Rockies have not broached the subject of a contract extension with the All-Star third baseman.

Arenado will enter his second of four years of arbitration eligibility after earning $5 million for the 2016 season. He’s due to a hefty pay raise and will continue on that track into free agency after the 2019 season. It may behoove the Rockies to get extension talks started sooner rather than later. Saunders, however, thinks that Arenado wants to see if the Rockies become contenders in the next two seasons before signing the dotted line.

Arenado, 25, enters Thursday’s action batting .293/.361/.567 with 40 home runs, 130 RBI, and 112 runs scored in 678 plate appearances. His 40 homers is best in the National League and the 130 RBI are best in the majors. He has an argument for winning the National League Most Valauble Player Award.

Video: Scott Boras eulogizes Jose Fernandez

MIAMI, FL - SEPTEMBER 28: A detailed view of a memorial wall in honor of Jose Fernandez on September 28, 2016 in Miami, Florida. Mr. Fernandez was killed in a weekend boat crash in Miami Beach along with two friends.  (Photo by Rob Foldy/Getty Images)
Rob Foldy/Getty Images
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Agent Scott Boras eulogized client Jose Fernandez at his funeral on Thursday. Boras couldn’t even get through the first sentence without breaking down in tears. It was difficult to watch without wanting to sob myself, but it was a touching eulogy that spoke for a lot of people who were fond of Fernandez.