Matt Joyce, Evan Longoria

The Rays need to get out of Tampa Bay


I don’t know that I know enough myself to make such a judgment, but that’s the judgment of ESPN’s Steve Berthiaume, who writes what I feel to be a fairly accurate and even-handed assessment of the problems facing the Rays in St. Petersburg, concluding thusly:

Again: This is not about assigning blame. Nobody is a bad person for not attending a baseball game. Even with 30 new ballparks one major league team would still have to be last in attendance, and even with a new stadium on the Tampa side, there is nothing to suggest that team wouldn’t be the Rays. The Tampa Bay area is a great place. It just hasn’t been a great place for Major League Baseball to do business.

The most compelling argument against the Rays’ viability in the Tampa Bay area that I’ve heard is the argument that, overall regional population aside, it’s a population that is really spread out in terms of miles from the ballpark. And that’s even before you factor in the bridges and other demographic considerations. At some point, you either feel like you have a ballpark nearby or you don’t, and the bulk of the population in the Tampa Bay Area apparently views the Rays as playing far away from them, in a location that isn’t worth the bother of reaching.

Of course, there are no easy solutions. There are very few if any cities that would be sure-things from a business perspective if the Rays were to relocate. Some would be better than St. Petersburg, but no sure things.

It strikes me that the best bet to ensure the financial viability of the franchise would be to move it into an area that is already part of the claimed territory of an existing team, such as Brooklyn or the New York suburbs. Inland Empire, California. That kind of thing. Such a move would certainly upset apple carts, but it would also reflect the population trends of the past few decades, and those trends are something to which baseball has always, eventually, had to adhere.

Shawn Tolleson becomes a free agent

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The Rangers outrighted reliever Shawn Tolleson off the 40-man roster on Wednesday. Rather than accept the assignment to Triple-A Round Rock, Tolleson has opted to become a free agent, Rangers executive VP of communications John Blake reports.

Tolleson, 28, emerged as a closer for the Rangers in 2015, but his follow-up campaign this year was dreadful. He finished with a 7.68 ERA and a 29/10 K/BB ratio in 36 1/3 innings. He eventually went on the 60-day disabled list with a back injury.

Despite the nightmarish season, it’s easy to see a team deciding to take a flier on Tolleson for the 2017 season.

Indians strongly considering starting Carlos Santana in left field sans DH

TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 19:  Carlos Santana #41 of the Cleveland Indians celebrates after hitting a solo home run in the third inning against Marco Estrada #25 of the Toronto Blue Jays during game five of the American League Championship Series at Rogers Centre on October 19, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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Indians slugger Carlos Santana hasn’t played in the outfield in a major league game since 2012, but the Indians are strongly considering starting him in left field for Game 3 of the World Series at Wrigley Field on Friday,’s Jordan Bastian reports. As the game is hosted in a National League park, there is no DH rule in effect, so the Indians might otherwise have to keep Santana on the bench.

Santana is hitless in six at-bats in the World Series thus far, but he has drawn two walks. He has overall not had a great postseason, carrying an aggregate .564 OPS in 40 plate appearances since the beginning of the playoffs. Still, during the regular season, he had an .865 OPS so he can certainly be a threat on offense at any given moment.