Ron Roenicke: Interleague play is unfair

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The Brewers look to be in a dogfight with the Cardinals in the NL Central all year. It’s hard enough to compete with the Cardinals, however, without being saddled with a tougher schedule. But a tougher schedule is what Milwaukee has, thanks to an interleague slate that includes trips to Boston and New York, a series against the Rays, and two series against the Twins for Milwaukee, while the Cardinals face Kansas City, Toronto and Baltimore.

In light of this imbalance, I have a hard time disagreeing with a thing Brewers manager Ron Roenicke said yesterday when asked about interleague play:

“It’s not fair. Interleague play is not fair. That’s all there is to it. I like interleague play. I think it’s really good. It’s good for the fans; I enjoy it as a coach and manager. I think the players enjoy playing different teams. So we all like it. The question is how in the world do we make this thing fair for everybody? That’s really difficult because of the different teams you have in different divisions. How do you divide those things up fairly for everybody? How do you do that?”

It’s probably too crazy to expect baseball to go back to purely balanced schedules given the gate and TV ratings brought by divisional rival games like the Yankees and the Red Sox. Such a state of affairs already means that teams competing for the wild card in different divisions have different schedules.  But compounding matters with schedules of radically different difficulty between teams competing for the same division is simply unacceptable, and Ron Roenicke has every right to complain about it.

 

Marlins catcher J.T. Realmuto reportedly asks to be traded

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Craig Mish of MLB Network Radio is reporting that Marlins catcher J.T. Realmuto has requested a trade out of Miami. Jon Heyman is characterizing it as Realmuto telling the team that he “wouldn’t mind” a trade.

Either way, Realmuto has no power to force a trade. This isn’t the NBA or something. Still, it’s evidence of just how dreary a prospect remaining in Miami is for Marlins veterans in the wake of trades that sent Giancarlo Stanton to New York, Marcell Ozuna to St. Louis.

Realmuto, who will turn 27 just before the 2018 season, hit .278/.332/.451 with 17 homers, 65 RBI, and eight steals over 141 games this past season. He only has three years of service time and is arbitration eligible for the first time this offseason. He made just $562K in the 2017 and will get a big raise this year, but he’s still going to be underpaid based on his production. If the Marlins wanted to trade him, they’d get a nice return. Why they would want to trade him, I have no idea.

Expect more of this sort of thing as the Marlins slash payroll and make it clear that their immediate priorities are more about saving money and less about winning baseball games. Which may or may not be a valid goal for the team’s new owners, but is certainly a letdown for baseball players and fans.