Fox won’t have Frank McCourt’s back if he takes the team into bankruptcy

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One possible strategy — outside of extreme and acrimonious litigation — Frank McCourt could pursue to thwart Major League Baseball’s seizure of the team when he fails to meet payroll is to put the team into bankruptcy.  I’m not a bankruptcy expert — not by a longshot — but generally speaking a bankruptcy filing puts the brakes on everything related to the asset in question. It stays pending lawsuits and collection actions and, in all likelihood, would temporarily halt Bud Selig from kicking McCourt out of the ownership chair.

Of course, that halt in the action would be intended for the bankruptcy court to get a handle on the assets and liabilities of the club, and during that time it would be incumbent upon McCourt to demonstrate how, exactly, he planned to get the team out of bankruptcy and up and running again.  And to that end, there’s a complication. As usual, here’s Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times:

Fox would not stand by Frank McCourt if the Dodgers owner were to ask a bankruptcy judge to order approval of the television contract rejected this week by Commissioner Bud Selig, two people familiar with the matter said Wednesday.

The Fox position would “severely complicate” any plans McCourt might have to file bankruptcy as a way to retain control of the Dodgers, said Rob Kampfner of White and Case, the firm that represented the incoming owners of the Texas Rangers through that club’s bankruptcy proceedings last year … “Frank would go in and wouldn’t have an exit strategy,” Kampfner said.

This is totally Richard III territory here. I love that part at the end where the dude gets abandoned by his allies, he can’t find a horse on Bosworth Field and then he gets hacked down.

Clayton Kershaw struggles with control, walks six Marlins

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Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw entered Wednesday night’s start against the Marlins without having issued a walk in his previous three starts. In fact, his last walk came on April 3 when he issued a free pass to Paul Goldschmidt with the bases empty and two outs in the bottom of the first inning. All told, Kershaw was on a streak of 26 walk-less innings before he took the mound at home to take on the Marlins.

Kershaw started off Wednesday in character, striking out the side in the first inning. He issued a walk in a tough second inning, but escaped without allowing a run. Kershaw walked two more in the third and again danced out of danger. In the fourth, Kershaw walked Lewis Brinson to load the bases with no outs and — you guessed it — didn’t end up allowing a run. His errant control finally came back to bite him in the fifth when Kershaw issued back-to-back two-out walks, then served up a three-run home run to Miguel Rojas down the left field line. His night was done when he completed the inning. Five innings, three runs, five hits, six walks, seven strikeouts, 112 pitches.

The six walks Kershaw issued over five innings marked his first six-walk outing since April 7, 2010 when he issued six free passes to the Pirates in 4 2/3 innings. The only other time he walked as many was on August 3, 2009 against the Brewers in a four-plus inning outing. Kershaw hasn’t even walked five batters in an outing recently — the last time was September 23, 2012 against the Reds.