Combination of file photos of MLB commissioner Bud Selig and Los Angeles Dodgers owner Frank McCourt

Why did Selig reject the Dodgers-Fox deal? Because it was more looting of the team by Frank McCourt

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The primary reason the Dodgers are in the boat they’re in right now is because Frank and Jamie McCourt took some $100 million out of the organization for personal use, carved up the team into individual components and leveraged it all to the hilt.

Bud Selig has just released his official statement regarding why Major League Baseball has rejected the Fox deal that Frank McCourt claims is critical for the Dodgers.  He is a bit more polite about it all, but his reasons are basically the same: the Fox deal would have put money in Frank and Jamie McCourt’s pockets, and would not have benefited the team.  In saying so, he cites “the best interests” power that Commissioners have always had, but which is so very rarely cited so explicitly:

Pursuant to my authority as Commissioner, I have informed Los Angeles Dodgers owner Frank McCourt today in a detailed letter that I cannot approve the club’s proposed transaction with FOX. This decision was reached after a full and careful consideration of the terms of the proposed transaction and the club’s current circumstances. It is my conclusion that this proposed transaction with FOX would not be in the best interests of the Los Angeles Dodgers franchise, the game of Baseball and the millions of loyal fans of this historic club.

Mr. McCourt has been provided with an expansive analysis of my reasons for rejecting this proposed transaction. Critically, the transaction is structured to facilitate the further diversion of Dodgers assets for the personal needs of Mr. McCourt. Given the magnitude of the transaction, such a diversion of assets would have the effect of mortgaging the future of the franchise to the long-term detriment of the club and its fans.

As I have said before, we owe it to the legion of loyal Dodger fans to ensure that this club is being operated properly now and will be guided appropriately in the future. This transaction would not accomplish these goals.

What has gone on with the Dodgers under McCourt’s watch is an atrocity.  What’s worse, it’s now being reported that even if Major League Baseball seized the Dodgers, McCourt would still own the parking lots and all manner of ancillary income.  McCourt is clearly using this as a buffer against MLB action, saying in effect,”if you take my team, I’ll be your new owner’s landlord.”  Which could certainly serve to depress buyer interest in the club.

Of course, the fact that that business arrangement is even allowed (i.e. an owner parsing out what should be team assets away from potential MLB control) is Major League Baseball’s fault.  As was letting McCourt into the club in the first place, so let us not weep too much for Major League Baseball here. Letting in clearly unqualified owners with questionable motives is something that never should have occurred, but which in any event needs to end now.  You can’t claim the best interests of baseball now when, a few years before, you weren’t all that damn diligent about it.

So where does it go from here? It would almost have to be litigation, one would assume, with Frank McCourt suing baseball for not approving the Fox deal or demanding that it be ratified immediately via some sort of injunction.  Baseball’s best bet is probably to simply take over when McCourt fails to make payroll at the end of the month and hope that they can swing it to a posture where the team and the ancillary assets could both be wrenched from McCourt’s control so as to make the Dodgers a more attractive asset for some billionaire.

But it’s going to get darker, it seems, before it gets light again.

Report: Arquimedes Caminero likely to sign with Yomiuri Giants

SEATTLE, WA - AUGUST 21: Arquimedes Caminero #48 of the Seattle Mariners delivers a pitch during a game against the Milwaukee Brewers at Safeco Field on August 21, 2016 in Seattle, Washington. The Brewers won the game 7-6. (Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)
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Mariners’ right-hander Arquimedes Caminero is nearing a deal with the Yomiuri Giants of Nippon Professional Baseball, according to Bob Dutton of the Tacoma News Tribune. The club has reportedly agreed to sell the 29-year-old’s contract, Dutton writes, though no official move has been announced by either team yet. Caminero is under club control through 2020 and currently ineligible for arbitration.

The right-hander began the 2016 season with the Pirates but was sent to the Mariners in a trade for Seattle minor leaguers Jake Brentz and Pedro Vasquez in order to clear space in the Bucs’ bullpen. With the Mariners, Caminero produced a 3.66 ERA and 8.2 K/9 through 19 2/3 innings in the second half of the year. Although he boasts an electric fastball, one which consistently averaged 98.7 m.p.h. in 2016, his success rate has been tempered by poor control throughout his major league career. According to Dutton, the Mariners’ willingness to sell Caminero’s contract was a strong indication that they did not see him as a viable contender for their 2017 bullpen or as a potential trade chip further down the line.

Should the deal go through, the right-hander will be the second former Mariner to sign with a Japanese club for the 2017 season. Per Dutton’s report, outfielder Stefen Romero also picked up a contract with the Orix Buffaloes of NPB in late November.

Gerrit Cole set to begin throwing program

PITTSBURGH, PA - AUGUST 24:  Gerrit Cole #45 of the Pittsburgh Pirates sits in the dugout in the second inning during the game against the Houston Astros at PNC Park on August 24, 2016 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Justin Berl/Getty Images)
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During the Pirates’ FanFest on Saturday, right-hander Gerrit Cole announced that he is back up to full health after being shut down with elbow inflammation in September. Per Rob Biertempfel of the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Cole said he’ll start a throwing program on Monday as he works on regaining his form for the 2017 season.

The 26-year-old pitched through 116 innings for the Pirates in 2016, delivering a 3.88 ERA and 2.5 WARP before landing on the disabled list in June with a triceps strain and again in August with elbow inflammation. It was a steep drop for the right-hander, who saw a considerable spike in his ERA and BB/9 rate and struggled to strike out batters at the 8.7 mark he managed in 2015.

The upside? Inflammation was the worst of Cole’s issues in 2016, and while the newfound health issues didn’t help his case for an extension, a more serious injury doesn’t appear to be on the horizon.