Edwin Rodriguez resigns as manager of the Marlins

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According to the Marlins’ official Twitter feed, manager Edwin Rodriguez announced his resignation before Sunday’s game. Bench coach Brandon Hyde is taking over the post on an interim basis, but 80-year-old Jack McKeon is also in consideration to finish out the season as skipper.

Rodriguez had been on the hot seat since the Marlins let go of hitting coach John Mallee in early June, and he decided to end the suffering himself after Saturday night’s 7-4 defeat in Tampa Bay. It was Florida’s 17th loss in the last 18 games.

The Fish courted ESPN analyst Bobby Valentine this past offseason and also showed heavy interest in current Nationals third base coach Bo Porter. They might look to make a long-term hire before the year is through. Or, as Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports suggests, the Marlins could wait until the offseason to make a run at White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen.

Rodriguez led the Marlins to a 46-46 finish in 2010 and managed the club to a 32-39 record this year. It’s not yet known if the 50-year-old native of Ponce, Puerto Rico will attempt to continue coaching.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.