Doug Davis pitches Cubs past Yankees in interleague opener

7 Comments

Friday’s lone day game had an unexpected result, as Doug Davis finally earned his first win as a Cub by shutting down the Yankees in a 3-1 victory.

The series represents the Yankees’ second trip to Wrigley Field during interleague play and the first since 2003.  A season-high 42,219 attended the game.

Davis entered the day 0-5 with a 5.90 ERA since joining the Cubs last month.  He hadn’t pitched more than 6 1/3 innings in any of his six starts this season.

Against the Yankees, though, he brought his ‘A’ game, taking a shutout into the eighth.  He was only charged with a run after he left, when Mark Teixeira singled in Nick Swisher from second off reliever Sean Marshall.

Carlos Marmol took over after that and got four outs, three coming via the K, for his 14th save.

The Yankees managed just five hits, three of them off Davis.  Swisher’s double, which knocked Davis from the game, was the only one that went for extra bases.

With just one run allowed in 7 1/3 innings, Davis dropped his ERA almost a full run to 4.95.

Freddy Garcia gave up all three runs for the Yankees in falling to 5-6.  The first two came quick, as a Kosuke Fukudome walk, a Starlin Castro double and an Aramis Ramirez single gave the Cubs a 2-0 lead in the first.

Another Castro double and Ramirez single resulted in the third run in the third.

Castro, who just reached five times in the win over the Brewers on Thursday, now has eight doubles in his last nine games.  His average stands at .314.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
5 Comments

Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.