Pete Rose on steroids and the Hall of Fame

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The San Francisco Chronicle posted a quick interview with Pete Rose on Thursday, in parge part to get his reaction to the Buster Posey collision and injury (click on the link if you want to read about that).  Rose, though, was also asked about steroids and had a pretty good take:

I’m not the one who is going to sit here and judge (Barry) Bonds, or judge Rafael (Palmeiro). All I know is they put up numbers. I’m going to tell you right now, though, Barry Bonds is one of the best hitters in the history of baseball. (Alex Rodriguez) is one of the better hitters in the history of baseball.

I’m not sure Mark McGwire was a Hall of Famer to begin with. I was a little surprised Raffy (Palmeiro) didn’t get more votes than he did. I’m going to hold my judgment on that until I get a real legitimate Hall of Famer like a Bonds or a (Roger) Clemens, and see what kind of response they get on the ballot. You know A-Rod has it made because he won’t be on the ballot until 2023. People will forget by then.

Pretty sensible if you ask me.  The only thing I disagree with is the idea that McGwire isn’t a Hall of Famer to begin with.  It sounds like Rose is saying McGwire doesn’t have Hall of Fame numbers (which he does), not that McGwire only has HoF numbers because of steroids (which is a more legitimate argument). I might be reading it wrong, though.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.