Ronnie Belliard turns a double play

Ronnie Belliard to retire after one final game tonight

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Veteran infielder Ronnie Belliard said Tuesday that tonight’s game for the Phillies’ Triple-A Lehigh Valley affiliate will be his last and that he’s going to retire.

Belliard signed a minor league deal with the Phillies after failing to make the Yankees out of spring training this year.  He played in 82 games with the Dodgers last season, hitting .216/.295/.327 in 162 at-bats.

Belliard was quite an underrated player at his peak.  He was viewed as a disappointment after coming up with the Brewers, in part because he never really improved after his strong rookie season.  Also, he often got dinged because he always carried some extra weight.  No one likes a middle infielder with a gut.

Still, he was a rock-solid second baseman for several years and even an All-Star in 2004.  He had his best Triple Crown season in 2005, hitting .284 with 17 homers and 78 RBI.  Later, he proved to be a very useful role player with the Nationals in 2008, hitting .287/.372/.473 in 296 at-bats, and in 2009, when he was a great pickup for the Dodgers down the stretch.

In all, Belliard hit .273/.338/.415 with 114 homers and 601 RBI in 1,481 games.  His career OPS+ of 96 bests that of fellow second basemen Brandon Phillips (.268/.318/.427, 94) and Aaron Hill (.268/.322/.420, 95).

Odds are that he would have had a longer and more productive career had he focused more on his conditioning. Maybe he’d still be going strong as a regular at age 36 right now. Teams certainly would have been more interested in taking a chance on him if he just once made a point of showing up in the best shape of his life.

But so what?  It was his career, and it was a darn good one that allowed him to make about $16 million in the process. Outside of the horrible 2002 season that caused the Brewers to kick him to the curb, he was pretty much always a useful player when healthy. And now he has a glorious second career in the world of competitive eating to look forward to.

Aroldis Chapman will rejoin the Yankees on Monday

New York Yankees relief pitcher Aroldis Chapman goes into his windup against the Toronto Blue Jays during the fifth inning of a spring training baseball game Thursday, March 10, 2016, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
AP Photo/Chris O'Meara
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Yankees reliever Aroldis Chapman was suspended 30 games by Major League Baseball under its domestic violence policy for an offseason incident in which he allegedly pushed and choked his girlfriend, then discharged a firearm at least eight times in his garage. Monday marks game number 30, and Chapman is set to rejoin the club then, MLB.com’s Bryan Hoch reports. Manager Joe Girardi plans to insert Chapman directly into the closer’s role if a save situation arises against the Royals on Monday.

Chapman will make two appearances in the Gulf Coast League this week to continue warming up. He had been throwing in extended spring training games at the Yankees’ complex in Tampa.

The Yankees acquired Chapman from the Reds at the end of December, sending Caleb Cotham, Rookie Davis, Eric Jagielo, and Tony Renda to Cincinnati in return. While the back end of the bullpen hasn’t been an issue for the Yankees, seemingly everything else has for the 8-15, last place club.

Hunter Harvey to undergo sports hernia surgery

Baltimore Orioles pitchers Chris Tillman, left, and Harvey Hunter (62) watch Brian Matusz throw a bullpen session during a spring training baseball workout in Sarasota, Fla., Monday, Feb. 23, 2015.  (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar
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Orioles pitching prospect Hunter Harvey will undergo sports hernia surgery this week, Eduardo A. Encina of the Baltimore Sun reports. He’ll be out of action for the next four to six weeks as a result.

Harvey suffered a groin strain during a minor league spring training game last month and reaggravated it during an extended spring training game last Thursday. A specialist found a tear which requires surgery to mend.

The 21-year-old Harvey remains the prospect in the Orioles’ minor league system (according to MLB Pipeline) despite not having advanced past the Single-A level. He last pitched in a regular season game on July 25, 2014. The right-hander has suffered a litany of injuries in the time since, including an elbow issue and a fractured leg.

The Potomac Nationals will play a triple-header on Wednesday

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On Monday, the Potomac Nationals were slated to play the Lynchburg Hillcats in a match-up of two Single-A teams. The game, however, was suspended in the fifth inning. The goal was to play a double-header on Tuesday — a nine-inning game followed by a seven-inning game.

Tuesday’s double-header, however, was postponed due to wet grounds. So the Nationals and Hillcats will play a triple-header on Wednesday starting at 3:00 PM EDT. The suspended game will be resumed in the fifth inning and then the two sides will play two seven-inning games, per the Potomac Nationals.

That, well, is something. Minor leaguers don’t get paid enough to play 19 innings (at least) in one day.

Brian Cashman on Yankees’ slow start: “Some leashes might be shorter than others.”

New York Yankees general manager Brian Cashman watches live batting practice during a spring training baseball workout Monday, Feb. 22, 2016, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
AP Photo/Chris O'Meara
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Yankees GM Brian Cashman isn’t exactly thrilled with the way his team has played over the first 23 games. The Yankees were swept by the division rival Red Sox over the weekend, running their losing streak to five games and sending their record down to 8-15, good for last place in the AL East.

As David Waldstein reports for the New York Times, Cashman says he may be forced to make some changes soon. “There’s only so long you can allow it to go on before tinkering. But it just needs to stop,” Cashman said.

Cashman continued:

“I’ve done this job a long time and I put this roster together,” Cashman said. “I feel it’s significantly better than it has performed, and when it doesn’t perform up to expectations over the course of time, I have a history of making changes. I would rather not go that route, but when you are forced to do so, you are forced to do so.”

Who have been the biggest contributors to the Yankees’ demise?

Cashman said, “Some leashes might be shorter than others.”

Headley likely has the shortest leash. Utilityman Ronald Torreyes has hit well, boasting an .875 in a limited sample of 24 plate appearances, but he could cut into Headley’s playing time at third base if Headley can’t figure things out. Outfield prospect Aaron Judge could get called up. Outfielder Aaron Hicks, who has taken only 28 PA thus far, could also be in line for more playing time.