Why are reporters in locker rooms anyway?

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Over at the Wall Street Journal today Craig Wolff writes about something I’ve been thinking about for a long time: what purpose, exactly, does it serve to have reporters in the locker room before and after games? Read the thinking-it-through parts of it all, which are good, but here’s the central question I think:

In the end, no matter what becomes of this American tradition, it’s probably time to start asking if all this standing around amounts to loitering and is worth the strain it puts on the relationship between press and players. It’s not clear that either side derives much from the transaction.

It used to be that the teams needed the local paper for publicity and stuff. That’s way less necessary now than it used to be, and in fact, the situation has reversed, with papers needing the team way more for circulation purposes.  But are the postgame quotes all that useful to the reader?  Wouldn’t the reporter’s face time be better spent trying to talk to athletes about more in-depth matters in feature stories?  Shouldn’t their gameday focus be more on the game itself, with their own analysis and insight — which in the case of most reporters is considerable because they’ve seen a lot of baseball — rather than transcribing the cliches?

Mark Feinsand of the Daily News is quoted in the article talking about how being in the locker room, despite the bad, empty quotes, is important for maintaining relationships, the sorts of which no doubt would lead to better feature stories like I’d like to see.  I get that.  It just seems to me that there’s gotta be a better way.

World Series Umpires Announced

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Major League Baseball just announced the umpires for the World Series.

The crew chief will be Gerry Davis. Davis was worked 136 career Postseason games, which are the most of any umpire in Major League Baseball history. This is his sixth World Series overall and third time as crew chief.

Joining Davis will be Phil Cuzzi, Laz Diaz, Dan Iassogna, Bill Miller, Paul Nauert and Mark Wegner. Wegner will serve as the replay official for Games One and Two, after which he will join the on-field crew as the left field umpire for Game Three. Cuzzi will be the Replay Official from Game Three through the conclusion of the World Series. Cuzzi will not be a field umpire for any of the games.

The breakdown: