GM on Phillies’ trade deadline plans: “You will not see a major move this year”

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General manager Ruben Amaro Jr. said yesterday that he has no plans to pick up a big bat before the July 31 trade deadline, telling Jim Salisbury of CSN Philadelphia: “You will not see a major move this year.”

Philadelphia has MLB’s best record at 37-25, putting the Phillies on pace for 97 wins, but the lineup ranks just eighth among NL teams in runs and Ryan Howard (.803) and Shane Victorino (.812) are the only regulars to top a .750 OPS.

Charlie Manuel has hinted that he’d like to see the Phillies bring in some offensive help, saying: “I think there has to be a cutoff somewhere.” However, so far at least Amaro is showing a lot more patience:

Would I love to see this team perform at a higher level? Yes. And I still believe they will. Because they can hit. They can do things. You will not see a major move this year. I don’t think we need it. Right now, I’m happy with the guys we’ve got and I’m hoping they get us to the dance. This is a good team that is not playing as good as it is.

Of course, as Salisbury notes Amaro’s confidence in veteran hitters turning things around isn’t the only factor at play, as the Phillies’ current $175 million payroll is the second-highest in baseball and just short of the luxury tax threshold. Or as Amaro put it: “For $170 million-plus, we should be good enough to be a World Series contender.”

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

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Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.