Nationals draft Bryce Harper’s older brother, Bryan Harper


Lost in Bryce Harper’s latest foray into villainy is that the Nationals drafted his older brother yesterday, using their 30th-round pick on South Carolina left-hander Bryan Harper (not to be confused with the Brian Harper who spelled his name without a Y and was a really good player).

This is actually the second time the Nationals have drafted Bryan Harper. They also picked him in the 31st round out of high school in 2008, but didn’t sign him. He went on to play with younger brother Bryce at College of Southern Nevada and then transferred to South Carolina this year.

Bryce naturally thinks Bryan is really good:

He’s one of the most dominating left-handed pitchers I’ve seen in my life. My brother’s pretty good and I wouldn’t say it if he wasn’t.

Perhaps, but Bryan Harper has a 5.40 ERA and 18/17 K/BB ratio as a reliever this season. For now at least Bryce should probably stick to hitting rather than scouting.

Adam Kilgore of the Washington Post speculates that the Nationals might send Bryan Harper to Single-A to play with Bryce. If they can sign him, of course. The 6-foot-5 southpaw still has one more season of eligibility left and could opt to return to school.

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.