Rubby De La Rosa

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

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Dodgers 6, Phillies 2: It was the first career start for Rubby De La Rosa. I saw him in spring training and man does he have great stuff. His control wasn’t anything to write home about here but he was effective enough over five innings to pick up the win. Also making his first start was Dee Gordon, who was 3 for 5 with a stolen base. Between the two of them it was a great night for Dodgers fans who want to believe the future is bright. Meanwhile, Roy Oswalt ain’t exactly missing bats lately. Here he gave up four runs on eight hits in six innings but only struck out one guy, which is no way to go through life, son.

Orioles 4, Athletics 0: Some national writer tweeted something yesterday about how he just wasn’t convinced that the A’s could compete in the West because, you know, they just weren’t as talented as the Rangers. That was only a slightly more bold statement yesterday when they were on a seven-game losing streak instead of an eight game one like they are now.  But I’ll follow his brave lead and say, no, I don’t think that the A’s are going to win 114 games. For the Orioles, Chris Jakubauskas got the win. Easily my favorite name to say since the Kevin Kubusheskie-era on “You Can’t Do That on Television.”

Braves 1, Marlins 0:  A signature 2011 Braves win. No offense — only two hits — but a great start from Tommy Hanson and then three shutout innings from Eric O’Flaherty, Johnny Venters and Craig Kimbrel.  And despite it being a win, it does only a little to make Braves fans feel great, because it just reminds us how bad the offense is and how, at some point soon, O’Flaherty, Venters and Kimbrel are going to break down from overuse. Still, beats losin’.

Indians 1, Twins 0: Carlos Carrasco breaks the losing streak for the Tribe, throwing eight and a third shutout innings. Only three hits for the Indians themselves, making their 1-0 win look like an offensive explosion compared to Atlanta’s. Though, yeah, that Delmon Young error sort of helped things. A bit.

Reds 8, Cubs 2: The Reds were already up 4-1 when Miguel Cairo hit his grand slam, but it certainly didn’t hurt either. Edinson Volquez makes his triumphant return to the Reds’ rotation. Before the game he said he had made some adjustments and that this time he wouldn’t be barfing up four runs in the first inning. And he didn’t. Actually a pretty nice game for Volquez (7 IP, 7 H, 1 ER).

Red Sox 6, Yankees 4: Jon Lester didn’t have a great day, but Freddy Garcia had a way worse one (1.2 IP, 4 H, 4 ER). By the time anyone could look up it was 3-0 Sox and the rest was mere settling the details. Both Bobby Jenks and Mark Teixeira left the game with injuries, though Teixeira’s little contusion is said to be minor at the worst. Two hits for Jeter on his quest to get to 3,000 before the ten-game home stand is over. Nine games left, 12 hits to go.

White Sox 5, Mariners 1: On Monday the Chisox beat Michael Pineda and on Tuesday they beat Felix Hernandez. What else ya got, Seattle?

Pirates 8, Diamondbacks 5: A three-run double by Lyle Overbay capped a five-run rally in the eighth as the Dbacks lose one they should have won, thanks mostly to David Hernandez’s lack of, well, everything. I sure hope that the decision to lift Daniel Hudson for him at 105 pitches isn’t keyed upon as the biggest problem here. Because Alan Trammell — filling in for the suspended Kirk Gibson — made that call, and man, I love Alan Trammell.

Blue Jays 8, Royals 5: Hey, Vin Mazzaro came back? Last we saw him he was giving up 14 runs in a little over two innings. He wasn’t great here –he gave up six runs in five innings — but he lowered his ERA from 22.74 to 17.47!

Mets 2, Brewers 1: In that post I did yesterday about the Citi Field dimensions, it was suggested that, hey, at least it helps Jose Reyes hit triples. Well, he was on the road in Milwaukee last night and still hit a triple, so he’d probably be OK anywhere. It was a big one too, giving the Mets both of their runs on the night.

Cardinals 7, Astros 4: A three-run RBI double by Jake Westbrook ended up plating the game winning runs. Homers from Pujols and Berkman helped matters along as well.

Tigers 8, Rangers 1: Texas was bombed for the second straight night, though, in contrast to Monday night,  it was 20 base hits — and no homers — that did ’em in on Tuesday. Rick Porcello gave up one run over six innings.

Rays 4, Angels 1: Rookie Alex Cobb gave up one run on seven hits in six and a third innings and B.J. Upton homered. The Angels have lost four straight.

Padres 2, Rockies 0: Tim Stauffer and Heath Bell combine to shut out the Rockies. The Rockies haven’t scored more than three runs in a game since a week ago Saturday.

Nationals 2, Giants 1: A solid start for Jordan Zimmermann plus an RBI single to boot. Washington could have done more against Jonathan Sanchez, but they hit into bases loaded double plays twice.

Umpires Bob Davidson, Bob Hirschbeck, Jim Joyce, and Tim Welke have retired

PITTSBURGH - JUNE 12:  Home plate umpire Bob Davidson yells at bench coach Jeff Banister #17 of the Pittsburgh Pirates after tossing him from the game against the New York Mets during the game on June 12, 2011 at PNC Park in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)
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MLB.com’s Brian McTaggart reports that umpires Bob Davidson, Bob Hirschbeck, Jim Joyce, and Tim Welke have retired.

Davidson, 64, was known as “Balkin’ Bob” for his tendency to call pitchers for balks. Davidson has also made a name for himself picking fights with players and managers, as well as unnecessarily escalating situations.

Hirschbeck, 62, didn’t quite have the reputation Davidson had, but he had a couple of notable incidents on his profile as well. Last year, when ejecting Twins slugger Miguel Sano, Hirschbeck said, “Get the [expletive] out of here.” In 2013, he threw a drum of oil on a fire that very easily could’ve been snuffed out with Bryce Harper.

Joyce, 61, was a well-liked and well-respected umpire who will go down in history for one mistake. On June 2, 2010, Tigers starter Armando Galarraga was one out away from a perfect game. Indians second baseman Jason Donald hit a weak grounder about halfway between first and second base. Miguel Cabrera went to his right to field it and flipped to Galarraga covering first base. It was a close call, but Joyce incorrectly ruled Donald safe, ruining Galarraga’s perfect game. To both Joyce’s and Galarraga’s credit, both handled the mistake with the utmost class.

Craig also wrote in detail about Joyce a few years ago. It’s worth a re-read.

Tim Welke, 59, actually announced his retirement last year, but I guess it wasn’t made official until recently. He underwent a left knee replacement procedure in January last year and then had his right knee replaced five months later.

Report: Facebook and MLB in discussions to stream one game per week

BARCELONA, SPAIN - FEBRUARY 21:  Founder and CEO of Facebook Mark Zuckerber gives his speach during the presentation of the new Samsung Galaxy S7 and Samsung Galaxy S7 edge on February 21, 2016 in Barcelona, Spain. The annual Mobile World Congress will start tomorrow and will host some of the world's largst communication companies, with many unveiling their last phones and gadgets.  (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)
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CNBC, citing Reuters, reports that Facebook and Major League Baseball are in discussions to stream one game per week.

Streaming is becoming more and more ubiquitous as it’s a more convenient way for people to access media they like. MLB Advanced Media, which handles MLB’s streaming service, is worth several billions of dollars. Last year, Disney paid $1 billion to purchase a 33 percent stake in BAMTech, the independent company MLBAM launched for its streaming.

Millennials and “Generation Z,” in particular, are driving the streaming trend. Forbes, citing the Digital Democracy Survey in 2015, reported that 56 percent of millennials’ media consumption was done via computer, smartphone, tablet, or gaming device. Those 30 years and older rely on television to watch film and TV shows at a clip higher than 80 percent.

Twitter is already in the sports streaming arena. It streams MLB, NFL, and NHL games as well as the PGA Tour.