And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

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Phillies 3, Dodgers 1: Cliff Lee hadn’t been looking like Cliff Lee lately. In this one, he looked like Cliff Lee (7 IP, 7 H, 0 ER, 10K).  Dee Gordon made his major league debut. He was inserted as a pinch runner in the ninth inning, took third on a single and then scored the Dodgers’ only run on a fielder’s choice.

White Sox 3, Mariners 1: Not many guys have out-pitched Michael Pineda this season, but John Danks did (7.1 IP, 7 H, 1 ER, 6K), snagging his first win of the year in the process.

Twins 6, Indians 4: Scott Baker didn’t look like he’d make it out of the first inning, but he settled down. That’s five wins in a row for the Twins. Five losses in a row for the Indians.

Orioles 4, Athletics 2: The Athletics would kill for their losing streak to be as short as five. This one was the seventh straight loss for Oakland. And they lost Mark Ellis to a hamstring strain in the sixth inning, though given how he’s been hitting, they may not notice his loss.

Reds 8, Cubs 2: Things continue to careen out of control for the Cubbies, who also lost their seventh straight. Matt Garza and reliever Jeff Samardzija each got lit up. Jonny Gomes drove in four.

Brewers 7, Marlins 2: Hey, the Feesh didn’t lose a one-run game!  Zack Greinke continues to round into form (7 IP, 7 H, 2 ER) and Prince Fielder drove in four. The Brewers, by the way, have won 13 of 16 games.

Tigers 13, Rangers 7: Colby Lewis didn’t have a lick of nothin’ (3.1 IP, 10 H, 9 ER and 4 — count ’em — 4 home runs).  Brennan Boesch had two of those homers, went 5 for 6 and drove in 5, making him the official RBI whore of the night.  Question: are we tired of that yet? I think we may be tired of it.

Giants 5, Nationals 4: Tim Lincecum needed five strikeouts to reach 1,000 for his career. He got exactly five, though he was not at his sharpest last night, allowing four runs in five innings. San Francisco rallied in the eighth to tie it, however, and Freddy Sanchez’s RBI single won it in the bottom of the 13th.

Rockies 3, Padres 0: Your standard six-pitcher combined shutout for Colorado.

Rays 5, Angels 1: Justin Ruggiano hit homer and drove in three and David Price took a shutout into the eighth inning. Ruggiano wouldn’t have even been playing — it was only his fourth start of the year — if there hadn’t been a bug going through the Rays’ clubhouse.

Royals 3, Blue Jays 2: Eric Hosmer hit a game-winning RBI single in the bottom of the 11th. I have this feeling we’ll hear more about this game soon, as Joe Posnanski — who is moving away from Kansas City — was taking in his last Royals game as a local and said he’d write a post about it. I’m sure his rendering will be better than anything I can spew about it at 5:30 in the morning.

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.