Trevor Gretzky

2011 Draft – Rounds 6-10 wrapup: Trevor Gretzky to the Cubs

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The Cubs picked one of the draft’s biggest names in the seventh, grabbing Wayne Gretzky’s son, Trevor, a high school first baseman.

Trevor Gretzky, who was the backup quarterback to Nick Montana (Joe’s son) on his Oaks Christian high school football team, is thought to be on his way to San Diego State.  At 6’4″ and 190 pounds, he’s thought to have pretty good power potential.  Still, most didn’t believe he’d go this high.  Bloodlines probably played a role in his selection, but given that very few players outside of the first few rounds go on to make the majors, one can’t blame the Cubs for wagering a seventh-round selection on the Great One’s progeny.

Other notes:

Four rounds after taking Vandy’s Jason Esposito, the Orioles picked another highly regarded third baseman, high scholer Nick Delmonico, in the sixth.  Back problems apparently scared some teams off.  He’s also committed to Georgia and may opt for school after getting drafted so much lower than expected.  He was viewed as a catcher by some, but the Orioles are going to see if he can make it at the hot corner.  His left-handed bat promises 20-homer power, and he’s quite discliplined for a high school product.

– The Padres went for Kyle Gaedele in the sixth.  He’s the great-nephew of tiny major leaguer Eddie Gaedel and a pretty fine prospect with ample power.  For thos curious, he stands 6’3″ and weighs 220 pounds.

– One pick later, the Rangers chose Derek Fisher at No. 204.  He’ll be an expensive sign if the team is going to lure him away from the University of Virginia, but he projects as a power-hitting left fielder.

– And one pick after that, Reds scouting director Chris Buckley chose his son, third baseman Sean Buckley.  It was actually something of a surprise he waited until round six to do so.  Sean was being looked at as a fourth or fifth rounder by teams other than Cincinnati.

– Oregon State’s Josh Osich, who missed the 2010 season following Tommy John surgery, was viewed by some as the top pitcher left on the board after rounds four and five.  The Giants grabbed him at No. 207.  He may have a future as an eighth-inning guy.

– Ivan Rodriguez’s son — also named Ivan, but who goes by Dereck — was picked by the Twins in round six.  He might have been a better prospect as a pitcher, but he wants to stick in the outfield.

– The Cards picked Kansas State outfielder Nick Martini in the seventh.  He hit just one homer in 221 at-bats this season, but he had a .503 OBP as a sophomore and a .442 mark this season.  At one point, he reached base in 93 straight games.  Unfortunately, he figures to move to left field in the pros and he’s going to have to show some power if he’s going to be a success there.

– The Pirates made another nice upside pick to begin the ninth round, selecting right-hander Clay Holmes.  The Auburn commit touches 95 mph with his fastball and has a promising curve.

– Milwaukee went with Dustin Houle in the eighth and will give him a look as a catcher.  The native of Canada was primarily a third baseman in high school.

– The Red Sox are going to see if Travis Shaw’s bat translates to wood after selecting him in the ninth.  The Kent State product hit .307/.405/.553 with 14 homers this season.  He’s sure-handed at third, but he lacks range.

– I haven’t written much about the Diamondbacks, but I do believe they’ve had a really good draft.  In the 10th, they took a flier on Kyle Winkler, a teammate of Matt Purke’s at TCU and another anticipated tough sign.   Baseball America rated him the draft’s No. 43 prospect.

Cardinals walk off on controversial double by Yadier Molina

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - SEPTEMBER 15:  Yadier Molina #4 of the St. Louis Cardinals reacts after he was called out on strike against the San Francisco Giants in the top of the six inning at AT&T Park on September 15, 2016 in San Francisco, California.  (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images
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Update (11:09 PM EDT):

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From unlucky to lucky, the Cardinals maintained their position in the National League Wild Card race with walk-off victory over the Reds on Thursday night.

The Cardinals went into the top of the ninth with a 3-2 lead over the Reds, but saw the game tied when Scott Schebler dribbled a two-strike, two out ground ball down the third base line. It seemed as if the baseball gods had turned their backs on the Cardinals.

In the bottom of the ninth against reliever Blake Wood, Matt Carpenter drew a one-out walk. Randal Grichuk then struck out, leaving all of the Cardinals’ hopes on Yadier Molina. Molina went ahead 2-0 in the count, then ripped a 95 MPH fastball to left field. The ball bounced high and over the left field fence for what seemed like an obvious ground-rule double. Carpenter motored around third base and scored the winning run.

The Cardinals poured onto the field in celebration and the umpires walked off the field. Manager Bryan Price wanted to have the play reviewed, but when he went onto the field, the umpires were nowhere to be found. Price chased after them but to no avail. As the Cardinals left the field and the stadium emptied, the Reds remained in the dugout. The Reds’ relievers were left in a bit of purgatory, standing aimlessly in left field after exiting the bullpen. Finally, the game was announced as complete over the P.A. system at Busch Stadium. The results are great if you’re a Cardinals fan, but terrible if you’re a Mets or Giants fan.

As Jon Morosi points out, the rules clearly state that the signage above the fence in left field is out of the field of play. The umpires got it wrong.

Price, however, also took too long to speak to the umpires. Per Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch:

If this happened between two teams playing a meaningless game, it would’ve been a lot easier to swallow, but Thursday’s Reds-Cardinals game had implications on not only the Cardinals’ future, but the Mets’ and Giants’ as well.

Freddie Freeman’s hitting streak ends at 30 games

ATLANTA, GA - SEPTEMBER 28:  First baseman Freddie Freeman #5 of the Atlanta Braves hits a single in the sixth inning to extend his hitting streak to 30 games during the game against the Philadelphia Phillies at Turner Field on September 28, 2016 in Atlanta, Georgia.  (Photo by Mike Zarrilli/Getty Images)
Mike Zarrilli/Getty Images
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Braves first baseman Freddie Freeman went 0-for-4 during Thursday’s win against the Phillies, snapping his hitting streak at 30 games. It marked the longest hitting streak of the 2016 season. Freeman’s streak of 46 consecutive games reaching base safely ended as well.

The longest hitting streak in Atlanta Braves history belongs to Dan Uggla, who hit in 33 consecutive games in 2011. Tommy Holmes hit in 37 straight for the Boston Braves in 1945.

During his hitting streak, Freeman hit .384/.485/.670 with 11 doubles, seven home runs, 27 RBI, and 26 runs scored in 136 plate appearances. That padded what were already very strong numbers on the season. After Thursday’s game, Freeman is overall batting .306/.404/.572 with 33 home runs, 88 RBI< and 101 runs scored in 677 plate appearances.