2011 MLB Draft – picks 2-5: Mariners take Danny Hultzen second

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The Mariners picked Virginia left-hander Danny Hultzen with the second choice in the draft.

A surprise already. The Mariners had long been thought to be the destination for the top college hitter, Anthony Rendon. However, concerns about Rendon’s shoulder may have soured the team on him. Hultzen has a low-90s fastball, a plus changeup and a slider. He’s expected to move quickly after going 11-3 with a 1.57 ERA and a 148/17 K/BB ratio in 103 1/3 innings for Virginia this season.

Diamondbacks selected UCLA right-hander Trevor Bauer with the third overall pick.

Bauer, who did his best to copy Tim Lincecum’s delivery and his college results, struck out a whopping 203 batters while going 13-2 with a 1.25 ERA for UCLA this season. He doesn;t have Gerrit Cole’s fastball, but he works at 92-95 mph and his curve is an excellent second pitch. He should move quickly and potentially contribute to the Diamondbacks’ cause next year.

The Orioles took high school right-hander Dylan Bundy fourth.

Bundy, whose older brother was an eighth-round pick of the Orioles three years ago, was viewed by most as the top high school pitcher in the draft. He may not have ideal size at 6’1″, but he’s incredibly strong and he throws in the mid-90s consistently. He also has a good curve and slider for a high school product. The Orioles will have to try to sign him away from a University of Texas scholarship.

Royals picked high school outfielder Bubba Starling with the fifth pick.

The Royals were believed to prefer a college pitcher, but with Cole, Bundy and Hultzen all gone, it was tough for them to pass on the local outfielder with the enormous ceiling. Starling figures to be a tough sign; he’s also a highly regarded running quarterback already signed to Nebraska. With tremendous speed and power potential, he could be a superstar if everything clicks.

Report: Diamondbacks acquire Steven Souza from Rays in part of three-team deal

Tampa Bay Rays
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Update (6:35 PM ET): This is a three-team deal also involving the Diamondbacks, per Nick Piecoro of the Arizona Republic. The Diamondbacks will receive outfielder Steven Souza from the Rays and second baseman Brandon Drury will head to the Yankees. Lefty reliever Anthony Banda will go to the Rays, Piecoro adds. The Diamondbacks will also receive prospect Taylor Widener from the Yankees, per Joel Sherman of the New York Post. MLB.com’s Steve Gilbert adds that the Rays will get two players to be named later from the D-Backs.

Souza, 28, is earning $3.55 million in his first of three years of arbitration eligibility, so the Rays are presumably saving money in moving him. Last season, Souza hit a productive .239/.351/.459 with 30 home runs, 78 RBI, 78 runs scored, and 16 stolen bases in 617 plate appearances. Souza’s arrival almost certainly pushes Yasmany Tomas out of a starting gig.

Drury, 25, has played a handful of positions in his brief major league career. Last year, he played second base in Arizona, batting .267/.317/.447 with 13 home runs and 63 RBI in 480 PA.

Banda, 24, made his major league debut last season, posting an ugly 5.96 ERA with a 25/10 K/BB ratio in 25 2/3 innings. The peripherals suggest he pitched better than his ERA indicated.

Widener, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the 12th round of the 2016 draft. This past season with High-A Tampa, he pitched 119 1/3 innings and posted a 3.39 ERA with a 129/50 K/BB ratio. MLB Pipeline rated Widener as the 14th-best prospect in the Yankees’ system.

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Robert Murray of FanRag Sports reports that the Rays will acquire second base prospect Nick Solak from the Yankees. The Yankees’ return is presently not known.

Solak, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the second round of the 2016 draft. He spent last season between High-A Tampa and Double-A Trenton, hitting a combined .297/.384/.452 with 12 home runs, 53 RBI, 72 runs scored, and 14 stolen bases.

MLB Pipeline ranked Solak as the eighth-best prospect in the Yankees’ system and the fifth-best second base prospect in baseball, praising him for his ability to hit line drives as well as his speed.