Jose Bautista Pirates

Anthony Castrovince rewrites Jose Bautista’s history


It’s a nice tale that’s Anthony Castrovince spins about Jose Bautista, and a lot of it is even true.  However, Castrovince is way guilty of overstating his case in this piece and Bautista’s story is good enough that it doesn’t need the exaggeration.

Castrovince’s piece suggests in multiple spots that the Pirates never gave Jose Bautista a chance.  Maybe they didn’t give him the right coaching, but opportunity wasn’t the problem.

There was the year the Pirates optioned him out in spring camp — not to
Triple-A but Double-A — then called him up in September and gave him
just seven starts in a month.

That year was 2005.  Bautista had just spent all of the 2004 season wasting away on major league benches because of his status as a Rule 5 pick.   Double-A was absolutely where he belonged, considering that he hit .242 with four homers in 195 at-bats for high-A Lynchburg in 2003 and then got just 88 at-bats in the majors in 2004.

Bautista hit .280/.359/.490 with 24 homers in Double-A (and a little bit of Triple-A) that year.  Also, Castrovince makes it sound like he was glued to the bench during the final month of the season.  He only got seven starts in September because Triple-A Indianapolis went to the International League playoffs and, as a result, he wasn’t called up until Sept. 16.

There was the year the Bucs had him back up a retirement-ready Joe Randa, and
another year they had him platoon with an equally retirement-ready Doug

No, there wasn’t.   Bautista opened 2006 in Triple-A and was called up to replace an injured Randa on May 7 despite hitting an underwhelming .277/.370/.426 with two homers in 119 at-bats.   From that point on, he started 101 and played in 117 of the Pirates’ 129 games, hitting .235/.335/.420.   He was no one’s backup, though he did move all over the field.

In 2007, Bautista was an everyday player.  He hit a respectable .254/.339/.414 in 532 at-bats.  That he only played in 142 games was a result of a couple of injuries.

2008 was the year Bautista was platooned with Mientkiewicz.  That lasted about a week.  It probably was a foolish move by the Pirates, but Bautista got off to an awful start both offensively and defensively, committing a rash of errors in April.  Bautista still started 79 and played in 99 of the Pirates’ 108 games before Andy LaRoche was acquired at the end of July.  That was what took him out of the team’s plans.  He was sent down two weeks later and traded to the Blue Jays a week afterwards.

Playing time and preparation led to Bautista’s ascension. In 2009, it was then-manager Cito Gaston who finally gave him the former and hitting coach Dwayne Murphy who helped hammer home the finer points of the latter. Working with Murphy, Bautista initiated a timing mechanism that starts his leg kick sooner and helps him explode on the ball.

In 2009, Bautista had 404 plate appearances, fewer than he had in 2006, 2007 or 2008.

Look, one can take issue Pirates coaching and I’ll certainly agree with it.  Bautista himself and the Blue Jays both deserve plenty of credit for what’s become of the player.

But to write that the Pirates didn’t give Bautista a chance is simply a lie.  He had 1,520 plate appearances in 400 games with the team and batted .241/.329/.403.  He averaged a homer every 31 at-bats.  He could always hit left-handers, but he was a major liability against right-handers in both 2006 and 2008, only putting together a solid showing against them in 2007.

And once the Pirates acquired LaRoche and installed him at third base, they did right by Bautista, shipping him to the Blue Jays three weeks later.

The people associated with the club back then, at least the ones not responsible for teaching Bautista to hit, deserve better than this.

Braves pitcher Matt Marksberry woken up from medically induced coma

ATLANTA, GA - AUGUST 4: Matt Marksberry #66 of the Atlanta Braves throws an eighth inning pitch against the San Francisco Giants at Turner Field on August 4, 2015 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Scott Cunningham/Getty Images)
Scott Cunningham/Getty Images

David O’Brien of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that Braves pitcher Matt Marksberry has been woken up from a medically-induced coma at an Orlando-area hospital. Marksberry complained of stomach pain and went in for a colonoscopy on Tuesday. During the procedure, he suffered a seizure and a collapsed lung.

Marksberry’s brother Ethan said on Facebook that doctors were removing an endotracheal tube, preparing to wake him from from the coma.

Marksberry tweeted on Monday:

Here’s hoping for the best for Marksberry as he recovers from this scary health issue.

Marksberry, 26, missed the last two months of the season with a shoulder injury. He spent most of the season with Triple-A Gwinnett but did face 17 batters at the big league level for the Braves this season.

Here are the lineups for NLCS Game 5

David Ross
Getty Images

It’s tied 2-2, but if you’re like most people you have feelings about who has an edge.

Maybe you’re a “momentum” person and you like the Cubs’ current vibe because they scored a bunch last night. Maybe you’re a “momentum is your next day’s starting pitcher” guy, and you prefer either Jon Lester or Kenta Maeda. Or maybe you’re playing chess with all of this and thinking a couple of moves ahead. As in “yes, the Cubs have an advantage tonight because Lester is better than Maeda, but if they DON’T win tonight they’re screwed because then they have to face Kershaw and Hill in Games 6 and 7.”

I dunno. I find all of that rather exhausting. Let’s just watch and see what happens. Here’s who will be doing the happening:


1. Dexter Fowler (S) CF
2. Kris Bryant (R) 3B
3. Anthony Rizzo (L) 1B
4. Ben Zobrist (S) LF
5. Javier Baez (R) 2B
6. Jason Heyward (L) RF
7. Addison Russell (R) SS
8. David Ross (R) C
9. Jon Lester (L) LHP


1. Kiké Hernández (R) 2B
2. Justin Turner (R) 3B
3. Corey Seager (L) SS
4. Carlos Ruiz (R) C
5. Howie Kendrick (R) LF
6. Adrian González (L) 1B
7. Yasiel Puig (R) RF
8. Joc Pederson (L) CF
9. Kenta Maeda (R) RHP