Anthony Castrovince rewrites Jose Bautista’s history

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It’s a nice tale that MLB.com’s Anthony Castrovince spins about Jose Bautista, and a lot of it is even true.  However, Castrovince is way guilty of overstating his case in this piece and Bautista’s story is good enough that it doesn’t need the exaggeration.

Castrovince’s piece suggests in multiple spots that the Pirates never gave Jose Bautista a chance.  Maybe they didn’t give him the right coaching, but opportunity wasn’t the problem.

There was the year the Pirates optioned him out in spring camp — not to
Triple-A but Double-A — then called him up in September and gave him
just seven starts in a month.

That year was 2005.  Bautista had just spent all of the 2004 season wasting away on major league benches because of his status as a Rule 5 pick.   Double-A was absolutely where he belonged, considering that he hit .242 with four homers in 195 at-bats for high-A Lynchburg in 2003 and then got just 88 at-bats in the majors in 2004.

Bautista hit .280/.359/.490 with 24 homers in Double-A (and a little bit of Triple-A) that year.  Also, Castrovince makes it sound like he was glued to the bench during the final month of the season.  He only got seven starts in September because Triple-A Indianapolis went to the International League playoffs and, as a result, he wasn’t called up until Sept. 16.

There was the year the Bucs had him back up a retirement-ready Joe Randa, and
another year they had him platoon with an equally retirement-ready Doug
Mientkiewicz.

No, there wasn’t.   Bautista opened 2006 in Triple-A and was called up to replace an injured Randa on May 7 despite hitting an underwhelming .277/.370/.426 with two homers in 119 at-bats.   From that point on, he started 101 and played in 117 of the Pirates’ 129 games, hitting .235/.335/.420.   He was no one’s backup, though he did move all over the field.

In 2007, Bautista was an everyday player.  He hit a respectable .254/.339/.414 in 532 at-bats.  That he only played in 142 games was a result of a couple of injuries.

2008 was the year Bautista was platooned with Mientkiewicz.  That lasted about a week.  It probably was a foolish move by the Pirates, but Bautista got off to an awful start both offensively and defensively, committing a rash of errors in April.  Bautista still started 79 and played in 99 of the Pirates’ 108 games before Andy LaRoche was acquired at the end of July.  That was what took him out of the team’s plans.  He was sent down two weeks later and traded to the Blue Jays a week afterwards.

Playing time and preparation led to Bautista’s ascension. In 2009, it was then-manager Cito Gaston who finally gave him the former and hitting coach Dwayne Murphy who helped hammer home the finer points of the latter. Working with Murphy, Bautista initiated a timing mechanism that starts his leg kick sooner and helps him explode on the ball.

In 2009, Bautista had 404 plate appearances, fewer than he had in 2006, 2007 or 2008.

Look, one can take issue Pirates coaching and I’ll certainly agree with it.  Bautista himself and the Blue Jays both deserve plenty of credit for what’s become of the player.

But to write that the Pirates didn’t give Bautista a chance is simply a lie.  He had 1,520 plate appearances in 400 games with the team and batted .241/.329/.403.  He averaged a homer every 31 at-bats.  He could always hit left-handers, but he was a major liability against right-handers in both 2006 and 2008, only putting together a solid showing against them in 2007.

And once the Pirates acquired LaRoche and installed him at third base, they did right by Bautista, shipping him to the Blue Jays three weeks later.

The people associated with the club back then, at least the ones not responsible for teaching Bautista to hit, deserve better than this.

Video: Hanley Ramirez’s No. 250 career home run barely left the field

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Hanley Ramirez played a pivotal role during the Red Sox’ 9-4 win over the Angels on Friday night, crushing a two-run homer off of Alex Meyer to bring the Sox up to a four-run lead in the fourth inning.

Well, crushed might be the wrong word. The ball cleared the right field fence with a mere 350 feet, landing just beyond Pesky’s Pole to bring Ramirez’s career home run total to an even 250.

According to the ESPN Home Run Tracker, Ramirez’s milestone blast wasn’t the shortest home run of the year — not by a long shot. That distinction currently belongs to Rays’ outfielder Corey Dickerson, who skimmed the left field fence at Rogers Centre with a 326-foot homer back in April.

Asdrubal Cabrera requests trade from Mets

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It’s shortstop or bust for Asdrubal Cabrera, who told reporters Friday that he will request a trade from the Mets after getting bumped to second base (via Newsday’s Marc Carig). Cabrera served as the club’s starting shortstop through the first few months of the 2017 season, but lost the role to Jose Reyes while serving a stint on the 10-day disabled list with a sprained left thumb. The switch was confirmed prior to the Mets’ series opener against the Giants on Friday, prompting Cabrera to announce his trade request before taking the field.

Per MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo:

Personally, I’m not really happy with that move,” Cabrera said. “If they have that plan, they should have told me before I came over here. I just told my agent about it. If they have that plan for me, I think it’s time to make a move. What I saw the last couple of weeks, I don’t think they have any plans for me. I told my agent, so we’re going to see what happens in the next couple weeks.

Mets’ GM Sandy Alderson appeared skeptical of Cabrera’s request, telling reporters that he wasn’t sure a trade was “something [Cabrera] really wishes” and saying the team would wait and see how the situation shakes out. That doesn’t mean the veteran infielder will see a return to short anytime soon, however, only that he might have a change of heart after settling into his new role.

This isn’t the first time Cabrera has balked at a position change. The Mets reportedly considered shifting him to third base earlier this season, but ultimately decided to keep him at short and denied his request to pick up his $8.5 million option for 2018, something Alderson said has little to no precedent. Further changes may be on the horizon when 21-year-old infield prospect Amed Rosario gets called up from Triple-A Las Vegas and second baseman Neil Walker returns from the disabled list, though the team has yet to address either situation.