Royals stud prospect John Lamb needs Tommy John surgery

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Heading into this season Baseball America ranked Kansas City left-hander John Lamb as the 18th-best prospect in MLB, but the Royals just announced that the 20-year-old former fifth-round pick will miss the remainder of season following Tommy John elbow surgery.

Lamb was one of nine Royals prospects to crack Baseball America‘s top 100 list after throwing 148 innings with a 2.38 ERA and 159/45 K/BB ratio between two levels of Single-A last season and was off to a strong start this year at Double-A, posting a 3.09 ERA in eight starts despite being extremely young for the level of competition.

Now he may not pitch again until mid-2012, which shows how even a historic stockpile of prospects can detiorate in a hurry. Of course, losing Lamb barely makes a dent in the Royals’ abundance of young talent and he’s so young that taking two entire seasons off would still leave him as one of the youngest pitchers at Double-A when he returns. Still, a tough blow for one of the game’s elite pitching prospects.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.