Is it really time to retire Gary Carter’s number?

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Today the New York Post’s Mike Vaccaro calls for Gary Carter’s number to be retired by the Mets.

I don’t think there are any hard and fast rules about when it’s appropriate to retire someone’s number — there clearly aren’t, as every team approaches it differently — but I do find myself approaching this with more questions than answers.

  • Question: Why, in the 22 years since Carter has retired, haven’t the Mets retired his number?
  • Question: If there’s a reason for that — say, someone just decided that Carter wasn’t worthy of such an honor — how has it changed due to Carter’s diagnosis?
  • Question: If there wasn’t a reason for that and it was mere lazy oversight, is changing course on that now — in light of a possibly terminal cancer diagnosis — an awkward thing for Carter? Does it turn the affair into a premature wake? If I’m Gary Carter, do I ask “hey, why didn’t you do this before now?”

Of course I also can’t help but think that none of these little questions matter. Serious illness changes things. It makes it excusable for someone like the Mets brass to change their minds. It also makes it OK for Carter to rise above any resentment he may have had that the Mets hadn’t honored him before now (if, indeed, he has any, and I have no idea if he does).  Oh, and it’s worth noting that the first ever retired number was Lou Gehrig’s, done in 1940, prior to his death but clearly done in response to its imminence.

Yet I’m still a bit ambivalent about this. Part of me wants to say that it’s weird to rush to honor Carter now, and that it sends an unsettling signal of finality when everything in our being tells us that it’s time to fight and think positively no matter how long the odds.  Part of me wants to say that there’s no downside to a celebration of Carter, even if the timing is a bit awkward. And I can’t ignore the fact that my ambivalence has a lot more to do with my discomfort with the idea of death than anything having to do with Gary Carter and retired numbers.

Ultimately I suppose all of this depends on Carter and how he’d feel about it all if the Mets approached him.

What do you feel about it?

Report: Diamondbacks acquire Steven Souza from Rays in part of three-team deal

Tampa Bay Rays
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Update (6:35 PM ET): This is a three-team deal also involving the Diamondbacks, per Nick Piecoro of the Arizona Republic. The Diamondbacks will receive outfielder Steven Souza from the Rays and second baseman Brandon Drury will head to the Yankees. Lefty reliever Anthony Banda will go to the Rays, Piecoro adds. The Diamondbacks will also receive prospect Taylor Widener from the Yankees, per Joel Sherman of the New York Post. MLB.com’s Steve Gilbert adds that the Rays will get two players to be named later from the D-Backs.

Souza, 28, is earning $3.55 million in his first of three years of arbitration eligibility, so the Rays are presumably saving money in moving him. Last season, Souza hit a productive .239/.351/.459 with 30 home runs, 78 RBI, 78 runs scored, and 16 stolen bases in 617 plate appearances. Souza’s arrival almost certainly pushes Yasmany Tomas out of a starting gig.

Drury, 25, has played a handful of positions in his brief major league career. Last year, he played second base in Arizona, batting .267/.317/.447 with 13 home runs and 63 RBI in 480 PA.

Banda, 24, made his major league debut last season, posting an ugly 5.96 ERA with a 25/10 K/BB ratio in 25 2/3 innings. The peripherals suggest he pitched better than his ERA indicated.

Widener, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the 12th round of the 2016 draft. This past season with High-A Tampa, he pitched 119 1/3 innings and posted a 3.39 ERA with a 129/50 K/BB ratio. MLB Pipeline rated Widener as the 14th-best prospect in the Yankees’ system.

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Robert Murray of FanRag Sports reports that the Rays will acquire second base prospect Nick Solak from the Yankees. The Yankees’ return is presently not known.

Solak, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the second round of the 2016 draft. He spent last season between High-A Tampa and Double-A Trenton, hitting a combined .297/.384/.452 with 12 home runs, 53 RBI, 72 runs scored, and 14 stolen bases.

MLB Pipeline ranked Solak as the eighth-best prospect in the Yankees’ system and the fifth-best second base prospect in baseball, praising him for his ability to hit line drives as well as his speed.