The business of baseball and the business of movies: not all that different

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I don’t know enough about the movie industry in order to know when the baseball GM/movie producer analogy in this story breaks down, but it’s an interesting read anyway:

In baseball, as in the movie business, everyone wants to develop younger, cheaper talent. GMs do it either by trading established players for young prospects or through an annual draft that stocks their farm system with players that can be paid far less money than the stars available through free agency. Studios do the same thing, either by restocking their franchises with inexpensive actors – think Chris Pine in the reboot of “Star Trek” or Shia LaBeouf in “Indiana Jones” – or by buying low-budget movies at film festivals.

Question: do movie fans do with their young stars what baseball fans do with prospects and say stuff like “really, Shia LaBeouf just needs more roles before you can write him off. They’re just not giving him a chance!”

Because if they do, we baseball fanatics probably need to take a closer look at the things we believe.

Corey Knebel sets modern record for consecutive appearances with a strikeout

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Brewers closer Corey Knebel set a modern major league record for relievers to start a season, as Thursday’s appearance marked his 38th consecutive appearance with a strikeout. He set down the side in order in the ninth inning, striking Josh Bell out to start the frame.

Aroldis Chapman held the record previously, recording a strikeout in his first 37 appearances of the season in 2014 with the Reds.

Knebel, 25, has flown under the radar despite having an incredibly good season. He moved into the closer’s role in mid-May when Neftali Feliz, now a free agent, struggled. After Thursday’s appearance, Knebel is 12-for-15 in save chances with a 0.96 ERA and a 65/17 K/BB ratio in 37 2/3 innings.

Joey Votto thinks he can win the Home Run Derby, but hasn’t been invited yet

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Despite having hit at least 20 home runs in eight of his 11 seasons in the majors, Reds first baseman Joey Votto has never participated in a Home Run Derby. Currently, he’s tied for the National League lead in home runs with 20, and he hasn’t been invited to this year’s festivities at Marlins Park.

In the event he is invited, Votto said he thinks he can win it, C. Trent Rosecrans of the Cincinnati Enquirer reports. Votto likened himself to Ichiro Suzuki, a player known more for his contact abilities and mastery of the strike zone than power. “Just think of me as the Canadian Ichiro — Japan has theirs and Canada has theirs,” Votto said. “I could pull homers into the seats at will.”

Along with the 20 homers, Votto is currently hitting .306/.419/.601 with 53 RBI, and 52 runs scored in 313 plate appearances.

Teammate Scott Schebler also has 20 home runs at the moment and Adam Duvall, who made it to the semifinals of the Derby last year, has 16. Neither of them have been approached about participating in the Derby, either. Per Rosecrans, in the event each was invited, Duvall said he would consider participating if he wasn’t an All-Star and Schebler would participate regardless. Votto said he would only participate if he made the All-Star team.