Hank Aaron receives an honorary degree from Princeton

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One of the more overlooked Bob Dylan songs of all time is “Day of the Locusts,” which recounts his mixed feelings on the day on which he received an honorary degree from Princeton University.  I love Bob Dylan more than any artist in the history of music, but like a lot of his songs, it was motivated by a bit of snotty cynicism and “I’m-better-than-you” sentiment.  Probably didn’t help that he had David Crosby with him the day he got his degree. I’m guessing the two of them circa 1970 were damn nigh insufferable together.

Anyway, I’m guessing Hank Aaron was a lot more graceful about this:

Hall of Famer Hank Aaron can add an honorary degree from Princeton University to his trophy case. The former home run record-holder was awarded an honorary doctorate of humanities for making America a better place with his “imperishable example of grace under pressure.” The university cited how he kept his cool while pursuing Babe Ruth’s home run record nearly 40 years ago.

See that? “Grace under pressure.”  Which means that this is the first baseball post in the history of blogging that cites both Bob Dylan and Rush at the same time.

Sorry to drag you into this, Hank.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.