And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

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Yankees 5, Athletics 0: Bartolo Colon with the four-hit shutout in which, in hindsight, the outcome was determined the moment Mark Teixeira hit his first inning homer.  A full house showed up at the Coliseum for this one. Gonna go out on a limb here and say that most of the fans weren’t there to root for the home team.

Diamondbacks 15, Marlins 4: Arizona stays hot, winning their seventh straight game. Miguel Montero was a total RBI whore, driving in five. Justin Upton went 5 for 5. Kelly Johnson was described in the game story as “falling a single short of the cycle.”  Well, considering that he had two homers, I suppose that “failure” is excusable.

Tigers 6, Twins 5: A weird fan interference call allowed Jhonny Peralta to score the go-ahead run in the eighth. Probably should have been ruled a ground rule double that would have made Peralta stop at third. Or the judgment on the fan interference should have been that Peralta wouldn’t have scored anyway. I find this less interesting from a “there should be replay!” perspective than from a “if we had replay, there will be more calls on which umpires will have to make judgments about where runners would have ended up, so maybe we need to figure out the best way to deal with it now” perspective.

Giants 7, Cardinals 3: An Andres Torres grand slam in the fourth turned a close one into a not-so-close one. It was Kyle McClellan’s worst start this year (4 IP, 7 H, 7 ER).

Reds 7, Brewers 3: What a shocker: Jay Bruce hit a three-run homer. He singled and tripled as well.  The Reds, coming off a disastrous road trip, are apparently happy to be home.

White Sox 7, Red Sox 3: Jon Lester was rocked while attempting to get his eighth win. Two RBI a piece for Alexi Ramirez, Carlos Quention and A.J. Pierzynski.

Mets 7, Pirates 3: The fourth game to end with a final score of 7-3 yesterday! This is important. This means something. [sculpts Devil’s Tower in his mashed potatoes].

Astros 12, Cubs 7: Strong bullpen work and big bombs help the Astros snap their losing streak. Clint Bamres and Hunter Pence smacked back-to-back homers in the fifth. The score alone makes it look like this was a rather unwatchable game. But two of the worst fielding teams in baseball also combined for five errors, making it extra special.

Mariners 4, Orioles 3: Jake Arrieta put the O’s in a 4-1 hole and, despite some great bullpen work by Baltimore, they couldn’t mount a comeback. Doug Fister allowed three runs in seven and a third while striking out nine.

Phillies 5, Nationals 4: Roy Halladay wasn’t at his best — he allowed ten hits, three of which were homers — but he’s lost enough games that he should have won that he was owed a pick-me-up by his teammates. A 92-degree game time temperature, and the Nats broke out the navy blue for Memorial Day. Sweet.

Padres 3, Braves 2: Kyle Phillips’ 10th inning homer — his first ever — wins it for the Friars. The Braves have played in approximately eight gajillion extra-innings games recently. This is mostly because their pitching is good and their offense is awful. This wouldn’t be the case if Dan Uggla hadn’t died. Wait that’s not fair: Uggla is 4-for-47 with one RBI in his past 14 games. An actual corpse would have had one less RBI than Uggla has had in that time.

Angels 10, Royals 8:  Oh, Joakim Soria, I hate to see you breaking down like this. It’s the third time he’s blown a save while giving up multiple runs in his last four outings and his fifth blown save overall this year. Torii Hunter’s ninth inning two-run homer put the Angels up for good.

Blue Jays 11, Indians 1: Jo-Jo Reyes wins! Jo-Jo Reyes wins! The winless streak is over! Now, let us find the next unfortunate person and fixate on his professional setbacks, feigning empathy!

Rangers 11, Rays 5: Twenty hits for the Rangers overall. They had an 8-0 lead before the Rays could muster much of anything. The third straight game with a homer for Mike Napoli.

Dodgers 7, Rockies 1: Andre Ethier and James Loney drove in three runs a piece and Chad Billingsley scattered — scattered? — yes, scattered 11 hits over seven innings. How the Rockies managed 14 total hits and four walks while only scoring one run is beyond me.

Aaron Judge was involved in a weird play in the fourth inning

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Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge found himself front-and-center in a weird play in the bottom of the fourth inning during Game 4 of the ALCS on Tuesday evening. Judge drew a walk to lead off the frame. After Didi Gregorius lined out, Gary Sanchez flied out to shallow right-center.

Judge must have thought the ball had a high probability of falling in for a hit, so he was past the second base bag around the time he realized his mistake. He retraced his steps, running back to first base. Reddick’s throw hopped a couple of times but first base umpire Jerry Meals called Judge out on the tag-up play.

Manager Joe Girardi requested a review and the call was overturned: Judge was safe. However, Astros manager A.J. Hinch wanted to challenge that Judge did not re-touch second base on his way back. Rather than issuing a formal challenge, the Astros had to appeal the play by having starter Lance McCullers throw to second base, at which point second base umpire Jim Reynolds would issue a ruling. McCullers was a bit hasty, though, and made his appeal throw before Greg Bird stepped into the batter’s box. Reynolds told McCullers that he had to wait. So, McCullers again made his appeal throw.

This time, Judge was running and he was simply tagged out at second base for the final out of the inning. No need for a review.

As Ken Rosenthal explained on the FS1 broadcast, the Yankees were trying to “beat the police.” They knew Judge would have been ruled out — replays clearly showed he never re-touched the base — so they had nothing to lose by sending Judge. If he was safe, the Astros would no longer be able to appeal the play. If he’s out, then it’s the same outcome they would have had anyway.