Rays apologize for Avril Lavigne’s dirty mouth

30 Comments

Avril Lavigne fan club president Kevin Kaduk passes along word that the Rays had to apologize to fans who attended her concert at Tropicana Field following Saturday’s game against the Indians because Lavigne used language “not consistent with the family-friendly atmosphere that Tropicana Field is known for.”

Now, personally I’d rather hear swear words than faux-punk rock from a pretty Canadian girl whose rebel persona seems to be built around wearing neckties with white undershirts, but Rays spokesperson Ray Vaughn explained that they “demand profanity-free performances from all of our concert performers.”

Marc Topkin of the St. Petersburg Times sets the scene:

Lavigne got off to a rough start when her microphone did not work during her first song. She responded to a chorus of boos with a profanity-laced explanation that things like that happen at a live performance, especially at a “baseball stadium.”

Actually, this might be the most punk-like thing Lavigne has ever done.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

Leave a comment

For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers’ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: