Too many Twins are in the best shape of their lives!

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The Twins have suffered a lot of injuries this year. Columnist Jim Souhan suggests that the problem may be over-training:

Thus the modern ballplayer is bigger, faster, stronger, better-trained, and yet seemingly more fragile. Might many of these new-age injuries be the result of over-training?

Michael Cuddyer agrees with the over-training thing. In contrast, broadcaster Jack Morris seems to suggest that players are wimpy and that the iron men of the 1980s with whom he played never would have allowed their teammates so much DL time.  We’ve heard this from others in Twins-land recently. Too bad Morris didn’t bark hard enough at Mark Fidrych when they were teammates in the late 70s. If The Bird would have been cajoled out of his apparent softness, those Tigers teams may have won more than the lone World Series. Missed opportunities.

I’m not sure what to make of the over-training argument because my experience with “training” begins and ends with me on my treadmill watching ballgames and X-files reruns while praying for the torture to end.  I’m sure, though, that better diagnosis, greater prudence on the part of trainers and players when it comes to injuries — not to mention the need to use injuries as a scapegoat any team’s poor performance —  has quite a bit to do with it too.

Javier Baez, D.J. LeMahieu have disagreement about sign-stealing

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Fellow second basemen Javier Baez of the Cubs and D.J. LeMahieu of the Rockies got into a disagreement in the top of the third inning of Sunday’s game at Coors Field over sign-stealing.

LeMahieu reached on a fielder’s choice ground out, then advanced to second base on Charlie Blackmon‘s single. While Nolan Arenado and Trevor Story were batting, Baez was concerned that LeMahieu was relaying the Cubs’ signs to his teammates. Baez decided to stand in front of LeMahieu to block any information he might have been giving to Arenado and Story. LeMahieu got irritated and the two jawed at each other for a bit. Umpires Vic Carapazza and Greg Gibson had to intervene to tell Baez to knock it off.

There has always been a back-and-forth with alleged sign-stealing. As long as teams aren’t using technology to steal signs, it’s fair game for players to relay information to their teammates about the opposing team’s signs. Last year, MLB determined the Red Sox went against the rules and used technology — an Apple watch in this case — to steal signs from the Yankees. Other teams in the past have been accused of using binoculars from the bullpen to steal signs. In this particular case with Baez and LeMahieu, there was no foul play going on, just Baez trying to make the Rockies cede what he perceived to be their slight competitive advantage.

The Cubs went on to beat the Rockies 9-7 on Sunday.