The Rangers give Ron Washington a 26 year-old GM product as a thank you

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I kid the GM people!  It’s just that I lived in Flint, Michigan for the first 11 years of my life and was surrounded by people — and continue to be in contact with many of them — who act as if General Motors didn’t make some pretty awful cars in the 1980s. And not just that, they treated you (i.e. my old man) like he had committed treason for buying a 1980 Toyota Supra back in the day.  As if he were trying to betray the auto industry. Pshaw! It’s just that he was entering his midlife crisis years, needed a peppy little sports car and couldn’t afford a Corvette thanks to the UAW blowing up the cost structure with their cushy, industry-killing demands!

Wait, I may have lost the thread there.  Never mind. The point here is that Ron Washington had a customized 1985 Cadillac Eldorado that he loved more than life itself which he lost in Hurricane Katrina. As a gesture of gratitude for the 2010 pennant, the Rangers tracked down one just like it, had it customized and presented it to Washington as a gift, and he is over-the-moon happy about it. Which is beyond cool.

Don’t laugh at Washington for loving that car. We all have irrational loves when it comes to vehicles. The car that I loved the most in my life was my 1987 Chevy Cavalier RS. Midnight blue. Got it before my senior year of high school and kept it through college. Despite it, you know, being a 1987 Chevy Cavalier RS, it ran like a top. And I didn’t care if the paint faded the hell off it in no time, a phenomenon with which anyone who owned a blue 1980s Chevy product is intimately familiar. It was my car, man. I loved that car. If they all hadn’t rusted out years ago, I’d buy another one in a second.

And no, that has nothing to do with the fact that I am the same age my dad was around the time he bought that 1980 Supra.  No midlife crisis here, no-siree, nope!

Jack Morris and Alan Trammell make the Hall of Fame on the Modern Era ballot

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The Modern Era ballot was revealed last month. The results have been announced on Sunday night. Jack Morris and Alan Trammell will be inducted into the Hall of Fame next summer.

Morris, now 62, pitched parts of 18 seasons in the majors, 14 of which were spent with the Tigers. He played on four championship teams: the 1984 Tigers, the 1991 Twins, and the 1992-93 Blue Jays. While his regular season stats weren’t terribly impressive beyond his 254 wins, Morris has always had a decent amount of Hall of Fame support due to his postseason performances. Morris shut the Braves out over 10 innings in Game 7 of the ’91 World Series. That being said, his postseason ERA of 3.80 isn’t far off his regular season ERA of 3.90. If you ask me, Morris doesn’t pass muster for the Hall of Fame. He now has the highest career ERA of any pitcher in the Hall.

Trammel, now 59, had been unjustly kept out of the Hall of Fame despite a terrific career. He hit .285/.352/.415 across parts of 20 seasons from 1977-96, all with the Tigers. He was regarded as a tremendous defender and made a memorable combination up the middle with Lou Whitaker, who also played with the Tigers from 1977-95. According to Baseball Reference, Trammell racked up 70.4 Wins Above Replacement during his career, which is slightly more than Hall of Famer Barry Larkin (70.2) and as much as Hall of Famer Ron Santo (70.4).

Steve Garvey, Tommy John, Don Mattingly, Dale Murphy, Dave Parker, Ted Simmons, Luis Tiant, and Marvin Miller were not elected to the Hall of Fame. Miller continuing to be shut out is a travesty. Craig has written at length here about Miller’s exclusion.