Not everyone can be Sergio Santos

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Sergio Santos and Kenley Jansen might be making it look easy, but the last week has seen three position players-turned-pitchers get released.

The most famous of the trio, former White Sox center fielder Brian Anderson, got let go by the Yankees today.  Anderson, who had been on the DL since May 2, was released despite opening the year with a 1.17 ERA and a 9/1 K/BB ratio in 7 2/3 innings for Double-A Trenton.

One figures he’ll be picked back up once healthy

The Red Sox earlier ths week released Ryan Harvey, who was drafted with the sixth overall pick in 2003 by the Cubs (nine spots ahead of Anderson).  He made the switch from the outfield to the mound with the Rockies last year, but he never actually got into a game.  The Red Sox had kept him at extended spring training since the beginning of the year.

Last, and probably least, is 28-year-old left-hander Miguel Negron, who was let go by the White Sox.  The one-time Blue Jays prospect had a 6.27 ERA and a 6/7 K/BB ratio in 8 2/3 innings for low Single-A Kannapolis. He was a first-round pick way back in 2000.

Apparently, the moral of the story is that only infielders and catchers make good pitchers.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.